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Unread 11-28-2005, 10:55 PM   #16
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Yes, that would be an extremely fun word to terribly misuse! Like, "The exausted messenger ran up, breathing diaphragmatically..."

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Unread 11-29-2005, 05:52 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallinguprawks
Yes, that would be an extremely fun word to terribly misuse! Like, "The exausted messenger ran up, breathing diaphragmatically..."
Haha, oh man, we can have a lot of fun with this. Or you can use it horribly out of context like....."I enjoyed the new movie diaphragmatically." or "Jackie Chan acted so diaphragmatically in that new movie!"
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Unread 11-29-2005, 08:26 AM   #18
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Vibrato is either natural, or comes from extreme vocal training, I have been taking voice lessons, and have been singing solos/been in a well directed choir for atleast 6 years now.. and i have only developed vibrato within the past 2 years.

If you REALLY want vibrato, you'd have to talk to a professional, as in someone who is in the business of vocal training, and ask them to teach you proper breathing techniques. Once you learn those, vibrato comes a bit easier. Just make sure that your throat is open, your pallet is high, and that you support every note, with every ounce of being that you have!
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Unread 11-29-2005, 10:58 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simple servant
Haha, oh man, we can have a lot of fun with this. Or you can use it horribly out of context like....."I enjoyed the new movie diaphragmatically." or "Jackie Chan acted so diaphragmatically in that new movie!"
Totally...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForeverPraise
Vibrato is either natural, or comes from extreme vocal training, I have been taking voice lessons, and have been singing solos/been in a well directed choir for atleast 6 years now.. and i have only developed vibrato within the past 2 years.

If you REALLY want vibrato, you'd have to talk to a professional, as in someone who is in the business of vocal training, and ask them to teach you proper breathing techniques. Once you learn those, vibrato comes a bit easier. Just make sure that your throat is open, your pallet is high, and that you support every note, with every ounce of being that you have!
Actually, you don't really have to talk to a professional to learn proper diaphragmatic breathing. Five posts ago, I explained it as well as I could, and if you still are having trouble understanding it or how to get it, there are many places on the internet or wherever that you can learn more about it. Still, if you can afford it, getting voice lessons can make it easier to learn.
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Unread 12-07-2005, 04:42 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenacen
*see title*
Hi brothers! I`m a young singer, and
I have some information for you )))))))))

Cathrine Sadolin

Complete Vocal Technique


Vibrato


Three types

Children and untrained singers usually do not have vibrato in their voice.
It is usually found in experienced singers. The speed and range of vibrato can vary greatly from singes to singer.

There are three tapes of vibrato: hammer, diaphragmatic, and laryngeal.


Hammer vibrato

Hammer vibrato is also known as vocal cord vibrato. It may be thought of as a long line of glottal attacks and may sound like a bleating sheep or a machine gun. This vibrato can be trained into the desired range and speed. It is often heard in Arabic singing as well as Spanish flamenco. It is also used by some French singers like Edith Piaf and by several folk singers. Hammer vibrato may be used as a preliminary exercise for practicing raped run of notes (see Techniques for Ornamentation, page 197). *89

If you wish to develop this vibrato it should be practiced. Inhale and then exhale with the feeling of a holding back your breath and copy the sound of a bleating sheep or a machine gun. This is a hammer vibrato. Practice the rapid pulsations until they become LIGHT and EVEN. Remember that it mast never be unpleasant or painful. Remember to use the three basic principles: keep an open throat by using support and avoiding tensions in the jaw and lips. *46

Last edited by Vandroiy; 12-07-2005 at 05:06 PM.
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Unread 12-07-2005, 04:43 PM   #21
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Diaphragmatic vibrato

Diaphragmatic vibrato is produced by the pulsations generated from the support muscles. If you open your throat you may be able to hear this pulsation on a note. Apart from an open throat diaphragmatic vibrato requires correctly functioning support. Its volume and speed can be controlled and, if combined with laryngeal vibrato, the pitch is also changeable. Diaphragmatic vibrato is only heard in Neutral. *90

Diaphragmatic vibrato occurs spontaneously when you are thinning a note with a large amount of support and an open throat. The vibrato can be heard when the throat is opened, and volume is halved without diminishing the support energy.
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Unread 12-07-2005, 04:44 PM   #22
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Practicing diaphragmatic vibrato

You can practise diaphragmatic vibrato in the same way as thinning a note or a pianissimo (see Volume, page 58). Sing a powerful note with solid support and an open throat. Make an octave leap and maintain the quality of the note. Gradually halve the volume but keep the throat open and maintain the support energy as if the sound was steel as powerful as before. It the throat is kept open the end of the note. You will feel a small, delicate vibration on the soft palate. When you are familiar with this sensation you can make it stronger if you want a larger vibrato. Make sure the jaw is not tightened and that the support is in motion. Be patient - diaphragmatic vibrato emerges as a natural extension of correct technique. At the beginning it is small, delicate and may be difficult to hear. Practise with others because it is easier for someone else to hear. *47

Diaphragmatic vibrato as image and sensation

- You can describe this small, delicate vibrato as a singer having twice as much support energy as required for the volume whilst keeping an open throat. If the support value is 100 and the volume is also 100, the note will be without vibrato. If the support value is 100 but the volume 50 and you have an open throat the extra 50 is used for producing the vibrato.
- The support must be firm and not jumpy
- The sound is like a long flow grooves on the surface.
- The feeling is relaxed (not the support) and a rough pumping


Laryngeal vibrato

The third vibrato is the laryngeal vibrato or throat vibrato. It produced more of difference between notes then diaphragmatic vibrato. It is made by moving the larynx up and down, creating a variation of pitch. This vibrato is often slower and broader and with a larger difference between notes than the other types. If your jaw and tongue are very loose, the laryngeal vibrato may from time to time be accompanied by a quivering tongue, jaw, and sometimes head.
Distinct laryngeal vibrato is often used by crooners, jazz singers, and blues singers. *91

Practising laryngeal vibrato

You can practise laryngeal vibrato by changing between two notes. Choose two notes so far apart (for example a major second: d-e-d-e-d-e and so on). Accelerate changing between the notes. Practise making the movement as fast as even as possible. (diagram 1).
Then choose two notes closer together (a minor second: d-eb-d-eb) and again practise speeding up between them (diagram 2).
Finally, make small changes within the same note (quarter tones or even smaller intervals), and practise making the movement as small and even as possible. You can help the vibrato by using the vibrating in the soft palate. *48

Practising speed
You can practise the speed of a vibrato by using a metronome. Set the metronome at 60 beats per minute and make three pulsations of sound per beat. Say ‘sss’-‘sss’-‘sss’ or ‘hey-ey-ey’. Practise these pulsation until they sound similar and even.
Then practise making three, four, or five pulsations per beat. Imagine the pulsations moving forwards, not up and down. Use more support if the vibrato is not even.

Speed up the vibrato by speeding up the metronome (beat per minute) until you reach the speed of pulsations you want. *49


Using vibrato

Skilled singers use vibrato to emphasise expression. All three tapes of vibrato can be used in a song.
Many singers adjust the speed of the vibrato to the rhythmic sub-divisions of the song. For example, you might choose to put a slow vibrato in a slow song and a fast vibrato in a fast song. A commonly used method to emphasies expression is to start on a note without a vibrato and then gradually add it towards the end. You may add intensity at special places by making the vibrato faster or by dalaying it. *92
Musical styles have their preference for types of vibrato. Classical singers often sing with a larger vibrato then rock singers. Rock singers hardly ever start a note with vibrato whereas classical singers almost almost always use vibrato from the beginning of the note.

If vibrato is wanted in Overdrive, Belting, and Curbing it must be added consciously. Vibrato usually costs even more energy in these modes.
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Unread 12-09-2005, 01:54 PM   #23
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There are some elderly ladies in my church choir that have more vibrato than they need; maybe they could lend you some.

Seriously, I have always thought it comes naturally with good technique.
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Unread 12-09-2005, 02:19 PM   #24
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Yeah, the weaker your vocal cords are the easier vibrato will come, and old women getting an overage of vibrato is a perfect example of this. They're (or should be ) trying to resist vibrato, but they can barely keep it down.
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Unread 01-26-2006, 11:43 PM   #25
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And there is such a thing as too much vibrato. Just listen to Kevin Max's CD. Every word is a bunch of vibrato.
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Unread 01-27-2006, 12:37 AM   #26
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Haha yeah I have Steriotype Be, as well as a couple of albums by DC Talk, and Max certainly has an unique voice.

But actually, what he has on his voice isn't real vibrato. What he's doing is a shake. The difference between a shake and vibrato is that shakes are done by purposely moving your voice up and down, whereas vibrato is simply allowed, but not forced. It's best to allow your voice to have natural vibrato that you can allow to happen if you want to as opposed to shakes that sound less natural and can become a habit that is hard to break. Ask Kevin Max to sing through a whole song without any shakes on his voice and he'd probably slip up a few times, just because he's so used to forcing it.
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Unread 02-07-2006, 09:25 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallinguprawks
If you really want vibrato, practice breathing diaphragmatically. To breathe diaphragmatically, practice laying on the ground and slowly inhaling. You have to be completely relaxed. When you inhale, allow the air to fill up your stomach, sides, and back, as if you are filling up an inner tube around you. Do not let your chest rise until the rest of your abdomen is completely full. Once you have mastered this, choose a comfortable note in your range and see how long you can sustain it by pushing the air out the same way you brought it in- using your diaphragm, not your chest or throat. Once you have had a lot of practice breathing diaphragmatically, put a lot of force behind a note (still, of course, using your diaphragm). A little way through that note, back off a little by pushing a little less. If you are doing it properly, you should get some vibrato. This is best for your voice. If you try to force it and add a "shake" to your voice, it can become a habid that is hard to break if you want to sing normally. This way, you can easily change back and forth, and the vibrato sounds more natural, because it is.

The above paragraph is explaining how to get vibrato (the right way) if you really want it. If you just sing diaphragmatically (which you should while singing no matter what), you will eventually get it anyways. Good luck!

-Jesse
So you control a vibrato by pushing more or less on a note?
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Unread 02-08-2006, 03:35 PM   #28
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wow I've never had a problem with vibrato? It honestly just came naturally to me, although I've been in a choir for at least the last five years or so. but i'm not really sure which vibrato i'd characterize it as...*shrug*
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Unread 02-08-2006, 09:45 PM   #29
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Quote:
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So you control a vibrato by pushing more or less on a note?
If you breathe diaphragmatically and start with a full, strong sound, when you want vibrato, back off with the airflow just a bit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jengoesup
wow I've never had a problem with vibrato? It honestly just came naturally to me, although I've been in a choir for at least the last five years or so. but i'm not really sure which vibrato i'd characterize it as...*shrug*
So you naturally have weaker vocal chords. Congratulations The weaker your vocal chords are, the easier it is to have vibrato. This is why old women in their church choirs have out-of-control vibratos. I, personally, can barely get any vibrato whatsoever, even if I try. But that's normal, because I am male and 17. I really don't want or need much, if any, vibrato because I'm primarily a contemporary singer.
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Unread 02-11-2006, 06:23 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallinguprawks
If you breathe diaphragmatically and start with a full, strong sound, when you want vibrato, back off with the airflow just a bit.

So you naturally have weaker vocal chords. Congratulations The weaker your vocal chords are, the easier it is to have vibrato. This is why old women in their church choirs have out-of-control vibratos. I, personally, can barely get any vibrato whatsoever, even if I try. But that's normal, because I am male and 17. I really don't want or need much, if any, vibrato because I'm primarily a contemporary singer.
There might be a flaw in your logic. Just because people with weak vocal chords have an easier time getting vibrato, doesn't mean that all people with natural vibrato have weak vocal chords. I had a natural vibrato when I was a teenager singing choral music (or at least I developed it pretty quickly and never really had to think about how to get it). I am 42 now and sing both choral and contemporary. I have learned how to increase my airflow to lose the vibrato for contemporary music.

Last edited by presbystrat; 02-13-2006 at 09:39 PM.
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