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Unread 12-08-2004, 01:54 AM   #31
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I need to go through the lessons already on here, but whatever there is to know I'd like to know it

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Unread 12-11-2004, 01:25 PM   #32
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I'll see if I can come up with some more stuff after Christmas. Way too busy right now to work on it right now, but soon.
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Unread 12-23-2004, 05:31 PM   #33
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Hablo espanol. Estoy en la clase de espanol tres ese ano. Hablares espanol todo la vez? Canto en espanol tambien. Mi favorito canciones de Navidad estan "Cantan Navidad" y "Mi Hombre de Nieve". Mi hombre de nieve es feliz y esta muy gordo. Conn la boca, la nariz, dos ojos en la cabeza un sombrero. La amo! Hablare contigo mas adelante. Adios y Feliz Navidad, mis amigos!
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Unread 11-12-2005, 05:52 PM   #34
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Hmmm... Dunno if it's against the rules to be posting here (Old thread or something of the sort), if it is, sorry about that.


Anyway! No lessons for the past year! Wow... I can't give much info (Only took a year of Spanish ), but I can help out a bit. I have a few questions, though, and I'll ask them soon, but anywho!

Just thought I'd point out the differences between the verbs ser and estar .

Both mean "to be."

However, they can not be used interchangeably (sp?). Estar is used for location and feeling (As in, how are you doing [aka ¿Como est`a usted?]). Ser is used everywhere else. Someone correct me if I'm wrong about that.

Anyway, my question:

How do you conjugate for future, past, etc? I only know present conjugation, but I DESPERATELY want to learn the others. Another thing: How do you make it like "He is dancing"? Would be it be "`El canta"? What is cantador then? Thanks for any replies! I love the language!
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Unread 11-12-2005, 07:50 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaGeek
Hmmm... Dunno if it's against the rules to be posting here (Old thread or something of the sort), if it is, sorry about that.
As a mod here, I don't really enforce that rule in this forum, because it gets so little traffic...so don't worry about it. If it's something really pointless, it will probably get closed, but if you're actually adding something, it's all good.

Quote:
Just thought I'd point out the differences between the verbs ser and estar .

Both mean "to be."

However, they can not be used interchangeably (sp?). Estar is used for location and feeling (As in, how are you doing [aka ¿Como est`a usted?]). Ser is used everywhere else. Someone correct me if I'm wrong about that.
This is about right.

"Estar" is generally for the temporary things--location, emotion, things that are happening now (which touches on your other question).

Ella es abburida = She is boring (permanent, it is one of her traits)
Ella está abburida = She is bored (just for the moment)

El carne es bueno = Meat is good (in general, it's a good thing)
El carne está bueno = The meat is good (this meat, it tastes good right now)

Él está bailando = He is dancing (right this minute)

There are some exceptions (for instance, you still say "Oregon está en los estados unidos," even though it's almost certainly there permanently), but it's a general rule.

"Ser" is for things that don't change, inherent traits of people and things:

Soy americana, soy una mujer, soy baja, mi casa es nueva, mi carro es azul.

Soy de los EEUU (I will always be from the US) pero estoy en los EEUU (I also happen to be in the US right now).

Quote:
How do you conjugate for future, past, etc? I only know present conjugation, but I DESPERATELY want to learn the others.
For future tense, there are two ways you can go about it, much like in English. You could say "I will dance later," or you could say "I'm going to dance later"--same thing in Spanish.

I will dance = Bailaré.
I'm going to dance = Voy a bailar.

Both are very simple. For the "will" version (el futuro) there's only one set of endings to memorize for all the -er, -ir, and -ar verbs.

Yo = é
Tú = ás
Usted, él, ella = á
Nosotros = emos
Ustedes, ellos, ellas = án

In general, you just take the infinitive, and slap the appropriate ending on. There are a few exceptions (when aren't there?) in which the root changes, but mostly, that's it.

For the "going to" version (el futuro próximo - near future) there is a simple formula: ir a [infinitive]. Conjugate "ir" however you normally would for the sentence, and you don't have to worry about conjugating words you're not sure of.

Voy a cantar, vas a bailar, Miguel va a tocar la guitarra... etc.

Past tense...I refer you <a href="http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/pretimp1.htm">here</a>, because I'm afraid I'm going to turn this post into a novel, and my free time on the internet is almost up. (Look around the site, there are a lot of good Spanish lessons there.)

Quote:
Another thing: How do you make it like "He is dancing"? Would be it be "`El canta"? What is cantador then? Thanks for any replies! I love the language!
I answered the first part, although there may be other ways. I'm not an expert on the language by any stretch of the imagination, and it's been ages since I've studied, so take everything I say with a grain of salt...or ten. (I will say, though, that "to dance" is "bailar," not "cantar," which means "sing." )

"Cantador" means "singer." That's a common ending for people; bailador (dancer), conquistador (conquerer), corredor (runner)...roughly the same as "-er" in English, I guess. Never really thought about it, heh.

Hope that helps.
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Last edited by Kati; 11-13-2005 at 09:18 AM.
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Unread 11-13-2005, 06:20 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kati
As a mod here, I don't really enforce that rule in this forum, because it gets so little traffic...so don't worry about it. If it's something really pointless, it will probably get closed, but if you're actually adding something, it's all good.


This is about right.

"Estar" is generally for the temporary things--location, emotion, things that are happening now (which touches on your other question).

Ella es abburida = She is boring (permanent, it is one of her traits)
Ella está abburida = She is bored (just for the moment)

El carne es buena = Meat is good (in general, it's a good thing)
El carne está buena = The meat is good (this meat, it tastes good right now)

Él está bailando = He is dancing (right this minute)

There are some exceptions (for instance, you still say "Oregon está en los estados unidos," even though it's almost certainly there permanently), but it's a general rule.

"Ser" is for things that don't change, inherent traits of people and things:

Soy americana, soy una mujer, soy baja, mi casa es nueva, mi carro es azul.

Soy de los EEUU (I will always be from the US) pero estoy en los EEUU (I also happen to be in the US right now).


For future tense, there are two ways you can go about it, much like in English. You could say "I will dance later," or you could say "I'm going to dance later"--same thing in Spanish.

I will dance = Bailaré.
I'm going to dance = Voy a bailar.

Both are very simple. For the "will" version (el futuro) there's only one set of endings to memorize for all the -er, -ir, and -ar verbs.

Yo = é
Tú = ás
Usted, él, ella = á
Nosotros = emos
Ustedes, ellos, ellas = án

In general, you just take the infinitive, and slap the appropriate ending on. There are a few exceptions (when aren't there?) in which the root changes, but mostly, that's it.

For the "going to" version (el futuro próximo - near future) there is a simple formula: ir a [infinitive]. Conjugate "ir" however you normally would for the sentence, and you don't have to worry about conjugating words you're not sure of.

Voy a cantar, vas a bailar, Miguel va a tocar la guitarra... etc.

Past tense...I refer you <a href="http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/pretimp1.htm">here</a>, because I'm afraid I'm going to turn this post into a novel, and my free time on the internet is almost up. (Look around the site, there are a lot of good Spanish lessons there.)


I answered the first part, although there may be other ways. I'm not an expert on the language by any stretch of the imagination, and it's been ages since I've studied, so take everything I say with a grain of salt...or ten. (I will say, though, that "to dance" is "bailar," not "cantar," which means "sing." )

"Cantador" means "singer." That's a common ending for people; bailador (dancer), conquistador (conquerer), corredor (runner)...roughly the same as "-er" in English, I guess. Never really thought about it, heh.

Hope that helps.

S`i. Uno pregunta (Or is it una? Lol, I really need to make sure I'm getting this right.... And I'm always forgetting if pregunta is the noun or the verb.):

Well, actually two questions , how are you accenting your letters? The hard way (Aka ALT + numberpad), or some other way, like in MS Word?

And... When you said "El carne es buena", wouldn't it be "El carne es bueno", as carne is a masculine noun?
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Unread 11-13-2005, 09:16 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by DaGeek
S`i. Uno pregunta (Or is it una? Lol, I really need to make sure I'm getting this right.... And I'm always forgetting if pregunta is the noun or the verb.):
Una pregunta. "Pregunta" in that context is a noun. The verb form is "preguntar," so "pregunta" is also the conjugation for third person, present tense.

Yo pregunto, tú preguntas, él/ella/Ud. pregunta, ellos/ellas/Uds. preguntan, nosotros preguntamos.

Quote:
Well, actually two questions , how are you accenting your letters? The hard way (Aka ALT + numberpad), or some other way, like in MS Word?
<a href="http://www.christianguitar.org/forums/announcement.php?f=239">Read the forum announcement.</a>

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And... When you said "El carne es buena", wouldn't it be "El carne es bueno", as carne is a masculine noun?
Whoops, started with a different word and changed what I was going to say. Yes, "el carne es bueno."
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Unread 11-13-2005, 02:22 PM   #38
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Sorry, I was kind of vague. By "Or is it una?", I mean uno the number, does it have to change to become "one [insert feminine noun here]"?
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Unread 11-13-2005, 02:59 PM   #39
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Yes. "One question" and "a question" are both "una pregunta."

(Also, I just noticed your user text--you might want to note that you are saying you love the guitar...romantically. A better choice might be "me gusta la guitarra.")
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Unread 11-13-2005, 09:06 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kati
Yes. "One question" and "a question" are both "una pregunta."

(Also, I just noticed your user text--you might want to note that you are saying you love the guitar...romantically. A better choice might be "me gusta la guitarra.")


Ah, so amar (I think that's it?) is only romance? Hm... I wanted to use the love that's not romantic, basically a strong liking. So there isn't one of those?
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Unread 11-14-2005, 06:34 AM   #41
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"gustar" and "querer" can both be used as a strong liking. "La quiero" or as Kati said "me gusta la guitarra." "Encantar" is also a stronger word, and is conjugated like Gustar: "Me encanta la guitarra."

I have heard "amar" used outside of romantic contexts, but that's only been in Christian songs talking about the love between sisters and brothers in Christ or the love that God has for us (which is a romantic love, I suppose...).
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Unread 11-14-2005, 06:43 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Jozeca
"gustar" and "querer" can both be used as a strong liking. "La quiero" or as Kati said "me gusta la guitarra." "Encantar" is also a stronger word, and is conjugated like Gustar: "Me encanta la guitarra."

I have heard "amar" used outside of romantic contexts, but that's only been in Christian songs talking about the love between sisters and brothers in Christ or the love that God has for us (which is a romantic love, I suppose...).
Yes--"encanta" is what I was about to suggest too.

"Amar" is a deep love between people, never something you would feel for an object. It can be used for things other than "romantic" love per se, like in the songs, but it's difficult if you're not fluent to know when it is and isn't appropriate, I find, so it's easier/safer to think of it that way, rather than scare some Spanish people with "amo mi perro mucho" or something.
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Unread 11-14-2005, 10:29 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kati
Yes--"encanta" is what I was about to suggest too.

"Amar" is a deep love between people, never something you would feel for an object. It can be used for things other than "romantic" love per se, like in the songs, but it's difficult if you're not fluent to know when it is and isn't appropriate, I find, so it's easier/safer to think of it that way, rather than scare some Spanish people with "amo mi perro mucho" or something.


Heh, gracias (Is there an accent in there?)!
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Unread 11-14-2005, 04:57 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kati
"Amar" is a deep love between people, never something you would feel for an object. It can be used for things other than "romantic" love per se, like in the songs, but it's difficult if you're not fluent to know when it is and isn't appropriate, I find, so it's easier/safer to think of it that way, rather than scare some Spanish people with "amo mi perro mucho" or something.
That reminds me of a time I was in Mexico... (well, the only time I was there.) One of our interpreters was talking to us about the word "love" in Spanish and how freely americans use the word "love." He said, "I love my girlfriend, I love my pizza, is there a difference?!" So whenever I think of inappropriate uses of "amar" I think of pizza. :-D I didn't speak much spanish back then, but I think of it a lot now.

Although I do have a friend who says that snowmobiles and guitars are the only things he'll ever be attracted to. We like to tease him about it... But, we probably still wouldn't use "amar" for that guitar!
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Unread 08-04-2006, 07:07 AM   #45
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Que bueno...gracias a ustedes
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