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Unread 01-23-2018, 12:21 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Giuseppe View Post
Wow. I usually skip even the most interesting theology threads cos tl;dr; (I am that lazy).

This is actually very interesting. Read this whole thread.

For the masses that are uneducated in Theology and can only think practically (a.k.a. me), can I come with some follow up questions based on real life?

Lets call it couple 1:

Married couple. Woman turns out to be crazy. She pulls a knife on the husband when he is in bed and keeps threatening him.

Is it against scripture for this man to leave his wife, seeing how she is a threat to his life?

Is it against scripture for this man to remarry?

Couple 2:

Married couple. After decades of marriage the husband divorces his wife in order to date/marry younger women. How should the woman left behind act in order to comply with Gods word?

Bonus:

What if a spouse is violent against the other spouse? Is it just a legal matter, or does scripture have something to say here.

What about in cases where one of the spouses abuses the children? May it be physically, psychologically, sexually, verbally...

I am aware that in the eyes of the law and society, these are more than enough for a separation/divorce. But what about from the scripture side?

1 Corinthians 7:11 11 But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband: and let not the husband put away his wife.


If, for whatever reason, the husband or wife cannot remain together, and one of them departs, let them remain unmarried or be reconciled to their spouse.

Those are the two options for those who separate due to whatever issues may arise. You can remain unmarried or you can make things right with your spouse.

Hence, the response of the disciples to the Messiah...

Matthew 19:10 His disciples said to Him, “If such is the case of the man with his wife, it is better not to marry.”


This can be a difficult teaching to receive, I know. We are called to the narrow path though. We are called to deny ourselves.


Matthew 16:24 Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.


Many people bring up children as a reason to justify staying in an adulterous relationship.


Matthew 10:36-38 36 And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.
37 He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.
38 And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me.




In the New Covenant the standard was raised in regards to murder, as Tony noted. In the New Covenant the standard was raised in regards to lust. In the New Covenant we no longer pay back an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, the standard was raised to where we are now told not to resist evil, but to turn the other cheek instead. In the New Covenant we are told to love our enemies and our neighbors alike, to bless those who curse us, pray for those who use us and persecute us. In the New Covenant the standard was raised in regards to marriage.

Romans 8:2-4 2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.
3 For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4 That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.



By the Holy Spirit, we are made new creations in Messiah, and we are not to be white washed tombs who legalistically comply outwardly, but inwardly are filled with dead men's bones and all manner of uncleanness.

We must be born again by the Holy Spirit, through faith in Jesus the Messiah of Nazareth. Then the righteousness of the law can be fulfilled in us, who are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit.

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Romans 10:2-4

2I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. 3For, being ignorant of the righteousness that comes from God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God's righteousness. 4For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.[a]

Romans 9:30-33

30What shall we say, then? That Gentiles who did not pursue righteousness have attained it, that is, a righteousness that is by faith; 31but that Israel who pursued a law that would lead to righteousness[d] did not succeed in reaching that law. 32Why? Because they did not pursue it by faith, but as if it were based on works. They have stumbled over the stumbling stone, 33as it is written, "Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense; and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame."

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Unread 01-24-2018, 09:01 AM   #17
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So...you get divorced and remarried. Can you be forgiven? I think that is the gist of the original poster's question. Scripture only mentions one sin that is incapable of being forgiven and that's the oft misunderstood blasphemy of the Holy Spirit.

Is divorce and remarriage a sin? Yes. Is it an unforgivable sin? No. I don't see anything in Scripture that suggests otherwise.
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Unread 01-24-2018, 12:48 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Leboman View Post
So...you get divorced and remarried. Can you be forgiven? I think that is the gist of the original poster's question. Scripture only mentions one sin that is incapable of being forgiven and that's the oft misunderstood blasphemy of the Holy Spirit.

Is divorce and remarriage a sin? Yes. Is it an unforgivable sin? No. I don't see anything in Scripture that suggests otherwise.
I agree that adultery is forgivable and that it is not an unpardonable sin. I suppose the real question would then be, is unrepentant sin forgivable? If a person dies living in sin, in an unrepentant state, is that person forgiven and heaven bound?

I would then point to all of the verses which were listed previously in regards to repentance and recommend doing a blueletterbible.org biblegateway.com or bible.com word search on "repent". I would also reference Matthew 7:22-23, 1 Corinthians 6:9-10, Revelation 21:27, and Revelation 22:14-15.


There is forgiveness for our sins in Yahushua the Messiah of Nazareth. If you do sin, confess your sins to the Messiah and repent. He is faithful and just to forgive us and cleanse us of all unrighteousness.


Proverbs 24:16 For a just man falleth seven times, and riseth up again: but the wicked shall fall into mischief.

If you fall, get back up, repent and continue following Jesus the Messiah.

Do not bring destruction upon yourself. You can be forgiven of adultery by the precious blood of the Lamb of YHWH.

Proverbs 6:32 But whoso committeth adultery with a woman lacketh understanding: he that doeth it destroyeth his own soul.
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Romans 10:2-4

2I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. 3For, being ignorant of the righteousness that comes from God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God's righteousness. 4For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.[a]

Romans 9:30-33

30What shall we say, then? That Gentiles who did not pursue righteousness have attained it, that is, a righteousness that is by faith; 31but that Israel who pursued a law that would lead to righteousness[d] did not succeed in reaching that law. 32Why? Because they did not pursue it by faith, but as if it were based on works. They have stumbled over the stumbling stone, 33as it is written, "Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense; and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame."
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Unread 01-24-2018, 01:31 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Daniel21TX View Post
I agree that adultery is forgivable and that it is not an unpardonable sin. I suppose the real question would then be, is unrepentant sin forgivable? If a person dies living in sin, in an unrepentant state, is that person forgiven and heaven bound?

I would then point to all of the verses which were listed previously in regards to repentance and recommend doing a blueletterbible.org biblegateway.com or bible.com word search on "repent". I would also reference Matthew 7:22-23, 1 Corinthians 6:9-10, Revelation 21:27, and Revelation 22:14-15.


There is forgiveness for our sins in Yahushua the Messiah of Nazareth. If you do sin, confess your sins to the Messiah and repent. He is faithful and just to forgive us and cleanse us of all unrighteousness.


Proverbs 24:16 For a just man falleth seven times, and riseth up again: but the wicked shall fall into mischief.

If you fall, get back up, repent and continue following Jesus the Messiah.

Do not bring destruction upon yourself. You can be forgiven of adultery by the precious blood of the Lamb of YHWH.

Proverbs 6:32 But whoso committeth adultery with a woman lacketh understanding: he that doeth it destroyeth his own soul.
And that would apply to adultery as well. Being divorced and remarried very well may be a sin but it is forgivable and people can repent by remaining faithful to their current spouse. Being remarried is not living in a state of unrepentant sin.
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Unread 01-24-2018, 03:56 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Leboman View Post
And that would apply to adultery as well. Being divorced and remarried very well may be a sin but it is forgivable and people can repent by remaining faithful to their current spouse. Being remarried is not living in a state of unrepentant sin.
How would you explain the exchange between John the Baptist, Herod and Herodias?


Mark 6:17-20 17 For it was Herod who had sent and seized John and bound him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip's wife, because he had married her.
18 For John had been saying to Herod, “It is not lawful for you to have your brother's wife.”
19 And Herodias had a grudge against him and wanted to put him to death. But she could not,
20 for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he kept him safe. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed, and yet he heard him gladly.




I had previously said in this comment thread "John the Baptist lost his life and was beheaded for telling Herod that it was not lawful for him to have his brother's wife. John the Baptist didn't tell Herod to acknowledge his sinful marriage to Herodias, feel sorry about it, believe in the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world and simply move on while continuing his illegitimate marriage. No, he told him it is not lawful for him to have his brother's wife. As long as Herod kept his brother's wife, although he had married her and took Herodias as wife, it was not lawful and the marriage was illegitimate. It was a continuous act of adultery that needed to be repented of. John the Baptist was telling Herod to separate from Herodias his illegitimate wife, because she was not actually his wife, but still the wife of his brother."


What would repentance look like in this situation in your opinion?

Did John the Baptist die in vain?

Should John the Baptist have simply told them to feel sorry for their illegitimate marriage and believe in the Lamb of YHWH who takes away the sins of the world?
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Romans 10:2-4

2I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. 3For, being ignorant of the righteousness that comes from God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God's righteousness. 4For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.[a]

Romans 9:30-33

30What shall we say, then? That Gentiles who did not pursue righteousness have attained it, that is, a righteousness that is by faith; 31but that Israel who pursued a law that would lead to righteousness[d] did not succeed in reaching that law. 32Why? Because they did not pursue it by faith, but as if it were based on works. They have stumbled over the stumbling stone, 33as it is written, "Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense; and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame."
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Unread 01-24-2018, 05:08 PM   #21
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I believe you are comparing apples to oranges in this case.

There is no indication that Herod was a believer or that he was convicted of and/or repented of his sin. In fact, he did the opposite. He had John killed.

This also occurred before Jesus went to the cross and died. There was no forgiveness of sin through the blood of Christ because he hadn't shed it yet.

What would repentance look like in this situation? The same as it looks in any situation where a Christian sins, is convicted of it, and repents (has a change of mind) concerning it.

Once divorced, one is no longer married to the first individual so the idea that he/she is continuing to live in adultery is erroneous.
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Unread 01-24-2018, 10:35 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Leboman View Post
I believe you are comparing apples to oranges in this case.
I disagree, and I believe the Scriptures make the matter crystal clear.


Quote:
There is no indication that Herod was a believer or that he was convicted of and/or repented of his sin. In fact, he did the opposite. He had John killed.

Of course Herod wasn't a believer. I wasn't claiming he was. I don't understand the point you are trying to make here.



Quote:
This also occurred before Jesus went to the cross and died. There was no forgiveness of sin through the blood of Christ because he hadn't shed it yet.
So are you saying that you believe that John the Baptist would be wrong if he had the same exchange with someone today?

John the Baptist was already preaching forgiveness of sins through the sacrifice of Yahushua the Messiah, the Lamb of YHWH that takes away the sins of the world.

The Messiah was also preaching the sermon on the mount and giving His new covenant teachings prior to His death, burial and resurrection.

If the solution to his unlawful illegitimate marriage is simply to feel bad about it and believe in the Lamb of YHWH that takes away the sins of the world, then why wasn't that option given?


Quote:
What would repentance look like in this situation? The same as it looks in any situation where a Christian sins, is convicted of it, and repents (has a change of mind) concerning it.
With any other sin, there is a forsaking of the sin. A turning away from the sin. Wrongs are righted. Reconciliation occurs.

Matthew 5:23 Therefore if thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath ought against thee;
24 Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift.


You do not simply change your mind about something. You make things right. Restitution is made. Reconciliation occurs.


If I stole your car and got away with it scot-free, removing the VIN numbers and all identifying markers, then repented about it, what would that repentance look like to you?


Would I simply feel bad about it, have a change of mind about stealing things, determine I won't steal any more stuff from you, but yet I keep your car and honk and wave at you as I drive by in your car that I stole from you, saying "I feel bad about what I did, I won't steal anything else from you brother, I've repented!", as you walk on foot because you no longer have a car due to my theft?


That just doesn't sit right, now does it? That is not repentance.

Luke 19:8-9 8 And Zacchaeus stood, and said unto the Lord: Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken any thing from any man by false accusation, I restore him fourfold.
9 And Jesus said unto him, This day is salvation come to this house, forsomuch as he also is a son of Abraham.


That is repentance.

Again, if a man has taken another living man's wife, what would that repentance look like to you?

What exactly do you mean when you say "has a change of mind"?


Quote:
Once divorced, one is no longer married to the first individual so the idea that he/she is continuing to live in adultery is erroneous.
Scripture? The new covenant teaching of Yahushua the Messiah of Nazareth and all of the Scriptures listed in this thread, clearly show that what you are saying is not true.

Feel free to interact with and explain all of the verses which have been listed previously which clearly contradict the idea that you are putting forth.
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Romans 10:2-4

2I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. 3For, being ignorant of the righteousness that comes from God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God's righteousness. 4For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.[a]

Romans 9:30-33

30What shall we say, then? That Gentiles who did not pursue righteousness have attained it, that is, a righteousness that is by faith; 31but that Israel who pursued a law that would lead to righteousness[d] did not succeed in reaching that law. 32Why? Because they did not pursue it by faith, but as if it were based on works. They have stumbled over the stumbling stone, 33as it is written, "Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense; and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame."

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Unread 01-25-2018, 09:56 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Daniel21TX View Post

Scripture? The new covenant teaching of Yahushua the Messiah of Nazareth and all of the Scriptures listed in this thread, clearly show that what you are saying is not true.

Feel free to interact with and explain all of the verses which have been listed previously which clearly contradict the idea that you are putting forth.
You brought up divorce in the case of marital unfaithfulness. Matthew 19:9 was mentioned. In that passage Jesus says that if you remarry after divorcing your wife for any reason other than unfaithfulness then you have committed adultery. We all agree on that. That stands to reason that you may remarry if you divorce your spouse due to his/her unfaithfulness. In order to remarry the original marriage covenant can no longer be in place or else you are now guilty of polygamy. Divorce ends the marriage. You are no longer married to your first spouse. I don't see how one can argue otherwise.

Back to remarrying outside the biblical parameters. Jesus says that to do so is adultery. No one is arguing against that. The difference here is whether that new marriage is a one time act of an adultery or an on-going adulterous relationship that can never be redeemed. You seem to be suggesting the latter. I have yet to see any Scripture to support that.

If you kill someone, you are a murderer. You can confess that sin. You can be forgiven. You can repent of that sin and never do it again.

If you divorce your spouse and remarry for non-biblical reasons, you are an adulterer. You can confess that sin. You can be forgiven. You can repent of that sin and never do it again. How? Remain faithful to your current spouse.

I believe that I have answered the OP's question.

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Originally Posted by athanatos View Post
My question is, suppose that it is immoral to remarry after an illegitimate divorce and the Christian remarries anyway, how does a Christian repent? What does repentance look like?

I have in mind an answer, but I want more information from Scripture and tradition to inform me since they are most authoritative on ethics. I don't just want practical advice. (This doesn't concern my own life, and I'm not passing on the advice per se)
This will be my last response. I just don't have the time to engage in a long drawn out debate.

Blessings.
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Unread 01-25-2018, 12:39 PM   #24
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You brought up divorce in the case of marital unfaithfulness. Matthew 19:9 was mentioned. In that passage Jesus says that if you remarry after divorcing your wife for any reason other than unfaithfulness then you have committed adultery. We all agree on that.
Yes, it was brought up, and I pointed out that the words for "fornication" and "adultery" (marital infidelity), are two different words used in the one sentence, distinguishing the one word from the other. It was pointed out how that this exception clause for porneia (fornication) is a reference to Deuteronomy 22:13-20, which says, 13 “If any man takes a wife, and goes in to her, and detests her, 14 and charges her with shameful conduct, and brings a bad name on her, and says, ‘I took this woman, and when I came to her I found she was not a virgin,’ 15 then the father and mother of the young woman shall take and bring out the evidence of the young woman’s virginity to the elders of the city at the gate. 16 And the young woman’s father shall say to the elders, ‘I gave my daughter to this man as wife, and he detests her. 17 Now he has charged her with shameful conduct, saying, “I found your daughter was not a virgin,” and yet these are the evidences of my daughter’s virginity.’ And they shall spread the cloth before the elders of the city. 18 Then the elders of that city shall take that man and punish him; 19 and they shall fine him one hundred shekels of silver and give them to the father of the young woman, because he has brought a bad name on a virgin of Israel. And she shall be his wife; he cannot divorce her all his days.

20 “But if the thing is true, and evidences of virginity are not found for the young woman, 21 then they shall bring out the young woman to the door of her father’s house, and the men of her city shall stone her to death with stones, because she has done a disgraceful thing in Israel, to play the harlot in her father’s house. So you shall put away the evil from among you.


It was pointed out that this is the situation that Joseph suspected he was in when he found Mary pregnant during their betrothal (engagement) period.

It was pointed out that the exception clause is only mentioned in the book of Matthew, which also happens to be where the story of Joseph and Mary, and Joseph's desire to put Mary away privately, is written about.

Quote:
That stands to reason that you may remarry if you divorce your spouse due to his/her unfaithfulness.
You are drawing a conclusion which is not stated in Scripture and which contradicts the new covenant teaching. You are also taking porneia (fornication), to mean post marital infidelity, when the Scriptures do not say or teach that. Again, feel free to interact with and explain from your position, all of the scriptures that have been listed which clearly contradict what you are teaching.

Quote:
In order to remarry the original marriage covenant can no longer be in place or else you are now guilty of polygamy. Divorce ends the marriage. You are no longer married to your first spouse. I don't see how one can argue otherwise.
Scripture? Again, feel free to interact with the Scriptures that have been listed which clearly contradict what you are teaching and explain them from your position. I don't see how you can argue otherwise, unless you simply ignore the Scriptures and refuse to interact with them.


Quote:
Back to remarrying outside the biblical parameters. Jesus says that to do so is adultery. No one is arguing against that. The difference here is whether that new marriage is a one time act of an adultery or an on-going adulterous relationship that can never be redeemed. You seem to be suggesting the latter. I have yet to see any Scripture to support that.
I am suggesting that it is continuous sin for as long as it is unrepented of and for as long as you continue in that sin. I gave Scripture to support my position that unrepentant sin remains unforgiven. I gave Scripture to support my position of what repentance actually is and looks like and gave a clear example which shows that your idea of "change of mind" is unbiblical and absurd, especially when viewed in the example of theft.

Quote:
If you kill someone, you are a murderer. You can confess that sin. You can be forgiven. You can repent of that sin and never do it again.
Agreed. You also can't bring that person back to life and make things right, so there would be no need to leave your gift at the altar and go and reconcile in that situation. In the case of adultery, theft, lying, bearing false witness, fornication, homosexuality, being a drunkard, etc, you are able to right the wrong and forsake the sin by no longer continuing in those sins. Repentance would be you turning away from that sin, no longer continuing in that sin, and righting the wrongs of your sin. If I bore false witness upon my neighbor in court, repentance wouldn't just be me feeling bad, determining never to lie and bear false witness again, and go on with my life while my neighbor remains in prison for a crime he did not commit. No, if I repented, I would need to right my wrong and tell the courts that I bore false witness.

You are comparing apples to oranges, which is why you didn't even bother interacting with the example of theft, or answer any of the questions I posed.

Quote:
If you divorce your spouse and remarry for non-biblical reasons, you are an adulterer. You can confess that sin. You can be forgiven. You can repent of that sin and never do it again.
You can be forgiven, if you repent and forsake your sin. The Scriptures call a person an adulterer for as long as the spouse lives. That is what the Scriptures teach, and since you refuse to interact with the Scripture and explain them from your position, I will re-post some of the same Scriptures which clearly state this.


1 Corinthians 7:39 The wife is bound by the law as long as her husband liveth; but if her husband be dead, she is at liberty to be married to whom she will; only in the Lord.

Romans 7:2-3 2 For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband. 3 So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man.



If you are married to another, while your spouse still lives, you are called in Scripture an adulterer.


Quote:
How? Remain faithful to your current spouse.
That is not your spouse if you are in an illegitimate marriage where the true spouse still lives.

See the verses listed above and refer to the exchange between John the Baptist, Herod, and Herodias.





Quote:
This will be my last response. I just don't have the time to engage in a long drawn out debate.

Blessings.

I understand, and I appreciate the civil discourse, although we obviously disagree with one another.

May YHWH bless you and guard you in the name of Yahushua the Messiah.
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Romans 10:2-4

2I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. 3For, being ignorant of the righteousness that comes from God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God's righteousness. 4For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.[a]

Romans 9:30-33

30What shall we say, then? That Gentiles who did not pursue righteousness have attained it, that is, a righteousness that is by faith; 31but that Israel who pursued a law that would lead to righteousness[d] did not succeed in reaching that law. 32Why? Because they did not pursue it by faith, but as if it were based on works. They have stumbled over the stumbling stone, 33as it is written, "Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense; and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame."
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Unread 02-14-2018, 01:54 PM   #25
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So, Orthodoxy strikes what I think is an interesting compromise on this.

Because we see sin as not primarily an issue of law-breaking, but of relational wounding between us and God, and us and our neighbor (in this case, divorce being between a husband and a wife), we see a divorce as sometimes the inevitable result of a pattern of sin on the part of one or both parties which ultimately leads to a breakdown of the marriage relationship, in some cases irreparably.

For this reason, and because we consider marriage to be a sacrament instituted for the mutual salvation of man and wife (to be 'companions on the journey to Heaven', as Chrysostom says) in which they work out their salvation in the arena of the home, in some situations it may be better, for the divorced person to be permitted to remarry. Particularly if their spiritual father feels that the issues that led to the breakdown of the first marriage have been sufficiently worked-through. And usually, Episcopal permission must be sought in such a case.

The Service for Second Marriage, however is very different from the Service if it is the person's first marriage. The first-marriage service is full of references to everyone who was blessed by obeying a marriage covenant faithfully:
Quote:
Priest: (+) Bless them. O Lord our God, as you blessed Abraham and Sara.

(+) Bless them, O Lord our God, as You blessed Isaac and Rebecca.

(+) Bless them, O Lord our God, as you blessed Jacob and all the Prophets.

(+) Bless them, O Lord our God, as You blessed Joseph and Asenath.

(+) Bless them O Lord our God, as You blessed Moses and Zipporah

(+) Bless them, O Lord our God, as You blessed Joakim and Anna.

(+) Bless them, O Lord our God, as You blessed Zacharias and Elizabeth. Preserve them, O Lord our God, as You preserved Noah in the Ark.

Preserve them, O Lord our God, as You preserved Jonah in the jaw of the sea beast. Preserve them, O Lord our God, as You preserved the holy Three Children from the fire, when You sent down upon them the dew of the Heavens. And may that joy come upon them which the blessed Helen had when she found the Precious Cross. Remember them, O Lord our God, as You remembered Enoch, Shem, and Elias.

Remember them, O Lord our God, as You remembered Your holy Forty Martyrs, sending down upon them the crowns from the Heavens. Remember them, O Lord our God, and the parents who have reared them, for the prayers of parents confirm the foundation of houses. Remember, O Lord our God, the wedding company that here have come together, to be present at this rejoicing.

Remember, O Lord our God, Your servant (Name) and Your servant (Name), and bless them. Give to them fruit of the womb, fair children, concord of soul and body. Exalt them as the cedars of Lebanon, and as well‑cultured vine; bestow on them a rich store of sustenance, so that having a sufficiency of all things for themselves, they may abound in every good work that is good and acceptable before You. Let them behold their children's children as newly planted olive trees round about their table; and, being accepted before You, let them shine as stars in the Heavens, in You, our Lord, to Whom are due all Glory, honor, and worship as to Your eternal Father, and Your All‑Holy, Good, and Life‑creating Spirit, both now and ever, and to the ages of ages.

Choir: Amen.
The service of second marriage, however, is far more penitential, containing language like this (apologies for the KJV-ish English, I couldn't find a source that didn't use it, though I know my church wouldn't).

Quote:
Priest: O Master, Lord our God, who sparest all and providest for all, who
knowest the secrets of men and hast understanding of all things: Do thou
the Fashioner and Creator, who knowest the weakness of human nature,
cleanse our sins, and forgive the transgression of thy servants, calling
them to repentance, granting them remission of iniquities, cleansing of
sins, and forgiveness of transgressions, whether voluntary or involuntary.
O thou who didst forgive Rahab the harlot, and didst accept the repentance
of the Publican, remember not our sins of ignorance from our youth up.
For if thou shouldest mark iniquity, O Lord, Lord who should stand before
thee? Or what flesh should be justified before thee? For thou only art
righteous, sinless, holy, plenteous in mercy, of great compassion, and who
turnest away from the evils of men. Do thou thyself, O Master, who hast
taken unto thyself thy servants N. and N., unite them to one another in
love; grant unto them the conversion of the Publican, the tears of the
Harlot, and the confession of the Thief, that, through repentance with all
their heart, doing thy commandment in peace and oneness of mind, they
may be counted worthy of thy heavenly kingdom. For thou art he that
ordereth all things and unto thee we ascribe glory to the Father and to the
Son and to the Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto ages of ages.
Finally, while a second marriage is sometimes permitted, and extremely rarely a third, a fourth is never permitted under any circumstance.

I think we strike a pretty good balance between recognizing that something has been irreparably broken and there is sin that has caused harm, and recognizing that it is not good for man to be alone and that a remarriage after divorce can be beneficial for a person's salvation.
__________________
Glory to God for all things...
~ Ryan
==========

In the flesh You fell asleep as a mortal man, O King and Lord,
You arose on the third day, freeing Adam from corruption and destroying death!
O Pascha of incorruption! The salvation of the world...

Exapostilarion of Pascha


Last edited by Homer Simpson; 02-14-2018 at 02:05 PM.
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