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Unread 11-12-2016, 02:39 AM   #1
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The Difficulties of Innovating: Guitar Makers and the Burden of Nostalgia

I thought this may be an interesting thing to discuss
I do like a lot of what we consider traditional ideas (Even within the relatively short history of the electric guitar), but acknowledge at one time those were not traditional ideas.
And I do like things that have come along later.
There's no reason I can't like old traditional & new fangled--and anything else in between.

But read the article--and let's discuss...

The Difficulties of Innovating: Guitar Makers and the Burden of Nostalgia

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Unread 11-21-2016, 11:27 AM   #2
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I think I would have to agree with this article. Though I am one of the traditionalists I do believe we have held back the music instrument industry in many ways. For the longest a guitar was a hollow chamber with 6 strings. Now the 7 string had become popular and we are setting other "strange" but cool variations being made. These new variations may not be for me as I have a hard enough time keeping up with six strings, lol. For those that are up for the challenge of these new instruments, then who am I to talk bad about it. I became a musician when my parents and most of my friends didn't understand it either.

Last edited by R1ridr; 11-22-2016 at 03:35 PM.
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Unread 11-21-2016, 12:35 PM   #3
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I'll have to check out the article later. On the whole, traditionalism is definitely a stifling mentality in the guitar world. Our "dream tones" tend to basically all be derived from a handful of players in the 50s and 60s. In turn, when people create stuff that isn't 100% in step with those sounds, it automatically must be "bad".
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Unread 11-22-2016, 10:33 AM   #4
Hey, I can change this!!!
 
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Bassist seem to be a lot more open to..... new stuff.

new woods, different string lay outs etc.

Fanned frets are becoming more common.... I have a 5 string Bass, an archtop, acoustic guitar and acoustic tenor guitar all with fanned frets. and while I'm still to see another instrument in real life with this feature, there are quite a few builders offering it.

one of my fav guitars has fanned frets, sound ports on the top edge, no sound hole on the front, and a floating cantilevered fingerboard. gets a LOT of strange looks!







still, compared to the brass world..... when did a trumpet last go through any changes?
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Unread 11-22-2016, 01:27 PM   #5
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Haha. Trumpets

What's a floating cantilever fingerboard?
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Unread 11-22-2016, 02:13 PM   #6
Hey, I can change this!!!
 
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not glued to the soundboard.

it sits about 5 mm proud so the whole top is free to vibrate.
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Unread 11-22-2016, 02:54 PM   #7
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could you put a close up of that? sounds cool.
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Unread 11-23-2016, 03:13 AM   #8
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don't have a camera handy..... the fingerboard just floats a couple of mm above the top rather than being glued onto it. there are a couple of carbon fibre rods epoxied into the back of it for extra support, but to be honest I don't think they were really needed.

construction pics below......



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Unread 12-03-2016, 05:24 PM   #9
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Acoustic guitar players have been particularly nostalgic. While some builders like Ryan Guitars and McKnight have played around with things like bevel soundports and double tops, the lust for nostalgia runs deep. Just look at the continued run of Authentic and Vintage series guitars by Martin. Builders continue to woo buyers with PreWar specs, hide glue, Brazilian Rosewood b/s, Adirondack spruce tops, etc.
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Unread 01-10-2017, 07:55 AM   #10
Hey ya'll, watch this!
 
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Acoustic guitar players like me, a flat picker, are decidedly against "innovation" for innovation's sake. I have yet to hear a guitar that sounds as good as, for example, Tim O'Brien's pre-war D-28. No amount of technology can overcome craftsmanship and materials in an acoustic guitar.

Having said that I'm really happy with some of the laminates that are relatively new to the scene. Saddle and nut materials have also come a long way. Pickup systems are a bit less problematic now than ever before but I still prefer a guitar without one. Workmanship is probably better than ever thanks to ever improving tools. And finishes have come a long way since 1938. Small builders are able to thrive today like Henderson, Bourgeouis, Froggy Bottom, and for at least a brief period Gary Cotten.

I recently played a show with a Chinese Eastman guitar ran through a condenser mic and some Fishman preamp. Sang through an auto tune box. It was real Buck Rogers stuff for the hillbilly set. I'm probably the most innovative one in my circle of friends.

Electric guitar? Name it. I'm a big fan of those old MIDI devices that Roland grafted on to some Fender guitars. Amps and processing equipment have come so far since I started out in the early 80's it's not even funny. Anything goes with electrics.

Still I have to say the best electric guitar sound I ever heard came from B.B. King playing through a dimed out Fender Twin and one of his Lucilles. Pure stinking poetry it was.

The thing to remember though is that tone is in the hands.
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