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Unread 12-14-2015, 01:03 PM   #46
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Absolutely. I feel like the original recordings are templates. Use them as a guide, not as a set rule. Adapt them to maximize functionality for your team and congregation.

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Unread 12-14-2015, 02:55 PM   #47
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If the worship is authentic, and the musicians don't get in the way by being over the top, or sound horrible, I don't think you can go wrong with it in a church. I may not listen to it in my car, but I love worshipping with the church. We shouldn't look for a worship set by any set of rules, other than seeking God. I listen to pretty much nothing but Christian music, and it does get old from time to time. Not because the material isn't out there, but that I'm lazy about searching for new music. I've never understood why we seek to bend worship into something that suits us. Agreed, it needs to be congregational, but I don't think that rules out hymns, but at the same time, if the people don't understand, how can they worship?
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Unread 12-14-2015, 06:39 PM   #48
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Christian pop and worship music tends to lag 5-25 years behind what's popular in the rest of society. In our church we play more hymns than the norm (for theology/poetry) and often rework the tunes. We also constantly mess with rhythm; why can't a boring Hillsong tune with some interesting lyrics get reworked as ska? Or Johnny Cash? And why not put some drums and a cooler guitar riff into a Tomlin tune? We customize guitars, why not songs?

Our worship team is constantly adding parts, reworking arrangments, making songs "ours"
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Unread 12-30-2015, 11:12 AM   #49
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The biggest problem (if you want to call it that) I have with modern church music is the disturbing trend to discard songs after a few years. I can remember fighting to get new songs into the service twenty years ago and hardly any (if any) are still around. Even the best of modern writers crank them out so fast that the shelf life for good songs is brief.

When was the last time a modern praise band did Shout To The Lord or Here I Am To Worship?

I prefer a noticeable blend of songs from different eras. Do hymns, do some of the Jesus Music choruses from the Sixties and Seventies, do Tomlin and Redman, do Rend Collective...do it ALL.

If the songs are good enough to do in worship services now...they'll still be good enough in 20, 50, or 100 years.
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Unread 12-30-2015, 03:28 PM   #50
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At the risk of being the "new guy" here, I'm going to offer something to consider.

If you're not getting joy and stimulation playing worship music for your congregation, I would suggest it is more of a heart problem than a musical problem. We play worship music for the Lord and to lead others in worshiping Him. The incredible honor that God, the one who created the universe, you, me, and the very music we play will allow a simple and sinful man such as I to play music to worship Him gives me chills every time I think about it. I've been playing in church praise bands for about 15 years now, have witnessed and lived through the music wars, the "7X24" insults and those days when the congregation seems more interested in Facebook than worshiping.

Through it all, Jesus remains constant and I realized a long time ago it's not about me, what challenges me, what I like. It is about worshiping Him.

To keep my music fresh and exciting, I took up banjo a few months back. I've even played it in a couple Rend Collective songs at church.

If you are truly feeling unchallenged and lacking excitement, perhaps it is best if you stepped away from the praise band for a while and examine the heart issues.

Will pray for you.

Jeff
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Unread 12-30-2015, 03:38 PM   #51
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At the risk of being the "new guy" here, I'm going to offer something to consider.

If you're not getting joy and stimulation playing worship music for your congregation, I would suggest it is more of a heart problem than a musical problem. We play worship music for the Lord and to lead others in worshiping Him. The incredible honor that God, the one who created the universe, you, me, and the very music we play will allow a simple and sinful man such as I to play music to worship Him gives me chills every time I think about it. I've been playing in church praise bands for about 15 years now, have witnessed and lived through the music wars, the "7X24" insults and those days when the congregation seems more interested in Facebook than worshiping.

Through it all, Jesus remains constant and I realized a long time ago it's not about me, what challenges me, what I like. It is about worshiping Him.

To keep my music fresh and exciting, I took up banjo a few months back. I've even played it in a couple Rend Collective songs at church.

If you are truly feeling unchallenged and lacking excitement, perhaps it is best if you stepped away from the praise band for a while and examine the heart issues.

Will pray for you.

Jeff
Hi Jeff. My name is Tony. Welcome to CGR.

You'll find many here who will agree with your point of view. I, however, contend that those who use the "heart condition" angle are pretty happy with the style of music that they play at church. The next line I'll hear is "it's not about style, it's about worshiping God."

To which I say: I'm glad that you feel that way about style. Now, if you'll do it to my preference then we'll both be happy.
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Unread 12-30-2015, 03:43 PM   #52
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I'm tired of 'worship music' too, which is why I'm glad I go to a church with 100% choral worship. Simple, reverent, and beautiful.
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Unread 12-30-2015, 03:46 PM   #53
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Hi Jeff. My name is Tony. Welcome to CGR.

You'll find many here who will agree with your point of view. I, however, contend that those who use the "heart condition" angle are pretty happy with the style of music that they play at church. The next line I'll hear is "it's not about style, it's about worshiping God."

To which I say: I'm glad that you feel that way about style. Now, if you'll do it to my preference then we'll both be happy.
Tony,
I don't particularly like the style every Sunday and our worship leader has some eclectic taste in song choice.

Don't want to argue with anyone here and I've found the discussion about worship music style is almost as divisive as talking about politics, abortion or the superiority of one denomination or non-denomination over another.

Didn't mean to step on any toes.

Jeff
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Unread 12-30-2015, 03:52 PM   #54
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Tony,
I don't particularly like the style every Sunday and our worship leader has some eclectic taste in song choice.

Don't want to argue with anyone here and I've found the discussion about worship music style is almost as divisive as talking about politics, abortion or the superiority of one denomination or non-denomination over another.

Didn't mean to step on any toes.

Jeff
I think everyone's toes are fine here, Jeff. Just having a little fun.

I hope you'll stick around to get to know us. You'll find a variety of views here, but CGR is a good place to share, and even disagree, with a fair amount of grace.
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Unread 12-30-2015, 03:57 PM   #55
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I think everyone's toes are fine here, Jeff. Just having a little fun.

I hope you'll stick around to get to know us. You'll find a variety of views here, but CGR is a good place to share, and even disagree, with a fair amount of grace.
Tony,
Thanks. Don't hesitate to let me know if I get out of line. Different on-line communities have different standards.

Just found this place a couple days ago. I plan to hang around a while. I tend to be more of a reader / lurker than poster of new threads.

Thanks again,
Jeff
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Unread 12-30-2015, 04:56 PM   #56
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Personally...I'm just tired of people on every side equating worship with music.

Yep.
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Unread 12-30-2015, 09:06 PM   #57
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The biggest problem (if you want to call it that) I have with modern church music is the disturbing trend to discard songs after a few years....When was the last time a modern praise band did Shout To The Lord or Here I Am To Worship?
50 years ago our society got used to popular songs coming and going every month or so. In the last 20 years the church has followed suit, due partly to our societal training and partly to a massive "worship" industry that continuously produces new songs and pushes them out to make a living. The positive is that good new songs are being written and the best get kept; the negatives are that there's a lot of dreck to be waded through and the sense that music is expendable if it's not "current". By the way, we play Here I Am to Worship every few months, and always at Christmas (2 weeks ago). Shout to the Lord, not often; to me there's just not enough song there.

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If the songs are good enough to do in worship services now...they'll still be good enough in 20, 50, or 100 years.
I'd like to think so but we've been taught too well that the new and well-promoted is good. If I could rephrase your statement I'd say, Try not to play songs in worship if you don't think they're good enough to last at least 20 years.
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Unread 12-31-2015, 10:06 AM   #58
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50 years ago our society got used to popular songs coming and going every month or so. In the last 20 years the church has followed suit, due partly to our societal training and partly to a massive "worship" industry that continuously produces new songs and pushes them out to make a living. The positive is that good new songs are being written and the best get kept; the negatives are that there's a lot of dreck to be waded through and the sense that music is expendable if it's not "current". By the way, we play Here I Am to Worship every few months, and always at Christmas (2 weeks ago). Shout to the Lord, not often; to me there's just not enough song there.
I grew up in the 1970s and the 1980s. I would have to disagree with your first statement. I can't recall learning very many new songs in church. Maybe 3-5 a year and most of those were gospel songs or choruses. We still did hymns for the most part.

I would suggest that there aren't as many "good" songs being released as some would claim. The LAST thing I think we should judge worship music by is whether or not it is current. Lyrics (not style) should come first. I honestly don't hear much these days that just strikes me as good. 10,000 Reasons is the last new song that really made me go, "Whoa."



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I'd like to think so but we've been taught too well that the new and well-promoted is good. If I could rephrase your statement I'd say, Try not to play songs in worship if you don't think they're good enough to last at least 20 years.
That's not what I'm saying at all. What I'm saying is, "If all these modern songs are so good, then why do they so quickly disappear?"
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Unread 12-31-2015, 12:45 PM   #59
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Leboman, I think you're actually agreeing with me in Part I, but we may have to agree on the math. You and I are about the same age and grew up before the rise of the Christian worship-entertainment industry, so back in the 70s and 80s (30-40 years ago now) we were singing mostly hymns, some Gaither, and a bit of those outlandish Andre Crouch, 2nd Chapter of Acts, etc. Maybe Amy Grant or the quieter Petra stuff. Then Maranatha Publishing got big in the late 80s, publishing their catalog of contemporary songs in easy-to-play books, before being succeeded by Vineyard, Kingsway, Hillsong, etc. That's all been in the last 25 years or so.

Also, we agree there's not so much good new stuff as people think, hence my reference to wading through the dreck to find it.

However, we agree that a few gems really stand out - like 10,000 reasons, a song I think can last if it's not overplayed.

Finally, I offered three reasons songs disappear: societal conditioning, a factory business model, and the fact that many aren't long-term keepers. 40 years ago (the 70s) there was no rush to get out the next big song, or the need of a hundred writers to each put out an album 2x a year. Those factors today mean we have a lot of potential for forgettable music! Not even my favorite poets, Watts and Wesley, hit 100% of the time, but when they did the songs have been used and loved by the church for almost 300 years. That is good writing!

Thanks for giving me the chance to be clearer.
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Unread 12-31-2015, 12:53 PM   #60
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Leboman, I think you're actually agreeing with me in Part I, but we may have to agree on the math. You and I are about the same age and grew up before the rise of the Christian worship-entertainment industry, so back in the 70s and 80s (30-40 years ago now) we were singing mostly hymns, some Gaither, and a bit of those outlandish Andre Crouch, 2nd Chapter of Acts, etc. Maybe Amy Grant or the quieter Petra stuff. Then Maranatha Publishing got big in the late 80s, publishing their catalog of contemporary songs in easy-to-play books, before being succeeded by Vineyard, Kingsway, Hillsong, etc. That's all been in the last 25 years or so.

Also, we agree there's not so much good new stuff as people think, hence my reference to wading through the dreck to find it.

However, we agree that a few gems really stand out - like 10,000 reasons, a song I think can last if it's not overplayed.

Finally, I offered three reasons songs disappear: societal conditioning, a factory business model, and the fact that many aren't long-term keepers. 40 years ago (the 70s) there was no rush to get out the next big song, or the need of a hundred writers to each put out an album 2x a year. Those factors today mean we have a lot of potential for forgettable music! Not even my favorite poets, Watts and Wesley, hit 100% of the time, but when they did the songs have been used and loved by the church for almost 300 years. That is good writing!

Thanks for giving me the chance to be clearer.
I agree...we're not really disagreeing with one another.

My experience was singing hymns almost exclusively. We did break out the little blue Country & Western book on some Sunday nights but Sunday morning was NEVER the place to introduce new songs or experiment. It wasn't until I was an adult that anything remotely similar to a modern praise and worship song was introduced into the Sunday morning service.

The church I serve now is still using a hymnal that is out of print. We do two new songs (via video screen) every Sunday but rarely are the worth repeating.

Now that I think about it, Lord I Lift Your Name On High is probably the first modern praise song I remember singing in church and that was 1990 when I was 20.
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