Go Back   Christian Guitar Forum > Musicians > Theory & Technique
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Arcade Mark Forums Read

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Unread 02-19-2013, 03:47 AM   #1
Registered User
 

Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 39
question on diff fingering for same chords

http://http://www.chordie.com/voicin...ADGBE&chord=C9

This website, just using it as an example, shows different fingering for the same threat (this being c9), some of the different methods look vastly different, wouldn't this change the sound of the chord completely then? Is there a short answer or is it deep music theory? If it's deep, then either a Yes or No will suffice cause I don't know much about music theory yet.

thanks

Beginner_guest is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 02-19-2013, 07:22 AM   #2
Heaven isn't too far away
 
gtrdave's Avatar
 

Joined: Dec 2004
Location: The First State
Posts: 6,730
Send a message via AIM to gtrdave
I'm having trouble with your link, but the short answer is the same chord can have many different fingerings.
As long as the triad and any additionals are in-tact (or assumed), any chord and its inversions can be played in a few different positions w/ different fingerings and still be the same chord.
C9, for example, contains the notes C, E, G (triad) and D (2nd) and Bb (dom 7th). Play them however you want and you'll have a C9, but know that some fingerings/voicings will sound more "functional" than others.
__________________
Lead, follow and get out of the way.

youtube
facebook
cd baby
gtrdave is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-19-2013, 12:04 PM   #3
Hey ya'll, watch this!
 
jeepnstein's Avatar
 

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,275
There are many paths to the same place, Grasshopper. That's what makes playing the guitar so fun as opposed to classical piano for me. You can decide how to get there based on your needs, your abilities, and physical limitations. Music theory is all about showing you a map to all those paths.

Forgive the drinking and smoking in this video, but it illustrates that even if don't, or cannot, use the "proper" fingerings you can do pretty much anything you can imagine.

Django Reinhardt Jattendrai Swing 1939 live - YouTube
jeepnstein is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-19-2013, 01:16 PM   #4
Registered User
 

Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepnstein View Post

Forgive the drinking and smoking in this video, but it illustrates that even if don't, or cannot, use the "proper" fingerings you can do pretty much anything you can imagine.

Django Reinhardt Jattendrai Swing 1939 live - YouTube

I'll never forgive the drinking, smoking and GAMBLING in that video! how dare anyone show this in public??? It is an affront to the Almighty! anyhew, so maybe you guys answered my question and I didnt realize it. Would the different fingering sound different? or because all the same notes are hit that is sounds the same? I guess I'm not understanding what is meant by more functional.
Beginner_guest is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-19-2013, 01:18 PM   #5
...
Administrator
 
thesteve's Avatar
 

Joined: Apr 2001
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 30,107
Send a message via AIM to thesteve
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beginner_guest View Post
I'll never forgive the drinking, smoking and GAMBLING in that video! how dare anyone show this in public??? It is an affront to the Almighty! anyhew, so maybe you guys answered my question and I didnt realize it. Would the different fingering sound different? or because all the same notes are hit that is sounds the same? I guess I'm not understanding what is meant by more functional.
Different fingerings do sound different. An open G will sound different than a barred G because even though the notes are the same, changing the strings they're played on and the hand technique used on those strings will affect the tone.

So, at a fundamental note level, the chord is the same, but it will sound slightly different to your ear.
__________________
We've all got ideas. We are the music makers. We make money to buy things, and write down words.

I'm a podcaster
thesteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-19-2013, 01:22 PM   #6
Registered User
 

Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 39
tenuous grasp on that now. thank you. I'm currently working through beginner music theory course, so it barely makes sense. I appreciate the answers though, it'll come together.
__________________
Been practicing music since Dec 25, 2012
Beginner_guest is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-19-2013, 01:44 PM   #7
Hey ya'll, watch this!
 
jeepnstein's Avatar
 

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,275
Different fingerings, and using different strings, will give a slightly different flavor to a chord. Either way may be technically correct but one will sound better to your ear. This is especially noticeable in an acoustic guitar that may or may not be "balanced" evenly across the strings. It's also the way a player kind of differentiates himself from everyone else. That's what Django did and why people struggle so mightily to replicate his playing.

Watch a video of a flat picker some time and you'll see this in practice more clearly. In this one, Tony Rice uses the same note on different strings for dramatic effect. It's also a matter of convenience some times.

Tony Rice "Shenandoah" - YouTube
jeepnstein is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-19-2013, 03:10 PM   #8
Registered User
 
Bushman's Avatar
 

Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Seaside, Oregon
Posts: 614
For an ultra simplistic view:
Every fret on your fretboard is a half-step.
Every note (A,B,C,D, E, F, & G) has a half step in between them (a sharp or flat note), except for E&F and B&C. (E&F and B&C are next to each other, fret wise)
Ab, A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G, Ab, A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G, Ab, A, etc....
Think of moving chords up and down the fretboard.
Move a G chord up two frets and it is now an A chord.
Move an F chord up four frets and it is now an A chord.
Move an E chord up five frets and it is now an A chord.
Move a D chord up seven frets and it is now an A chord.
(Note that where the nut is on an open chord would have to move up with the chord, which is what a barre' chord is.)
They sound different (different voicing) but are all an A chord.
Triads are small 3-note chords that can be moved around to provide different voicings for a given chord.
Triads have notes like Root-Third-Fifth in the given key, or other inversions like Third-Root-Fifth, or Fifth-Third-Root etc. All are the same chord with different sounds.
When I started learning about triads and how to apply them, it started making better sense to me...
Hope this helps some....
Bushman is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-25-2013, 10:41 AM   #9
Bears Football and Guitar
 
Guitarbite1985's Avatar
 

Joined: Jan 2008
Location: 1/50 chance to guess my state
Posts: 154
Bushman you forgot about the sharps! Geez!
__________________
Josh
claybar85@gmail.com
Guitarbite1985 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-25-2013, 01:05 PM   #10
Banned
 
DivineTones's Avatar
 

Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 51
Not only will various voicings affect the sound of the chord and how it interacts within the musical setting as a whole, but from a compositional standpoint, you will want to work out various voicings for various progressions.

If you read through a musical score (even if you don't know what you're looking at), especially a classical choral work, or some slow baroque counterpoint, your eye will notice that the notes *usually* lead up or down in a connected manner. It can be an aurally pleasing compositional practice to give each instrumental voice its own line, just a vocal lines are written, and although not always possible with the limitations of the fretboard, you can still find with at least some of your chords a more fluid connection by revoicing them up and down the neck.

It may take some work to figure it out, and a knowledge of theory will certainly help, but even using just your ear you should be able to listen carefully and hear how the movement of the various notes either complements the music, or just sounds good but with no discernible pattern. You don't always need that connectivity, but in certain progressions it can make you sound like you really know what you're doing
DivineTones is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-02-2013, 01:01 AM   #11
Registered User
 
rook3207's Avatar
 

Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 65
I usually will find out what the other guitarist is playing then I will play the same chord higher or lower that she does. Helps to add a fullness. And a lot of it just depends on the song, and the chord progression. That's how I kinda figure out where I'm going to play each chord.
rook3207 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-02-2013, 08:43 AM   #12
Rey de CGR
Administrator
 
DaGeek's Avatar
 

Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Here
Posts: 13,391
paid
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beginner_guest

I'll never forgive the drinking, smoking and GAMBLING in that video! how dare anyone show this in public??? It is an affront to the Almighty!
I like you already. I hope you stick around .
__________________
I am most definitely a guy.


Donate blood and save up to three lives! Skeptical or curious about the facts? Please click here and find out from the experts!
DaGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:24 AM.


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2