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Unread 07-21-2012, 04:44 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Role Modlin View Post
John Sykes...nice. I wonder how many people on CGR even know who he is?

I do, too.

The first Blue Murder album is one of my favorites from that era.

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Unread 08-01-2012, 10:58 PM   #47
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Alvin Lee
Jeff Beck
Al Dimeola
Chet Atkins
Eric Clapton
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Unread 08-02-2013, 06:30 PM   #48
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I think the top five would be

1.Eric Clapton
2.jimmy Paige
3.jimmy Hendrix
4.slash
5.Angus young
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Unread 08-03-2013, 07:54 PM   #49
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Hmmm...
1. Andy Summers
2. Johnny Marr
3. Aaron and Bryce Dessner
4. The Edge
5. Johnny Ramone
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Unread 08-05-2013, 08:48 PM   #50
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Let me see

1. George Van Epps - Brought sophisticated bass lines to jazz with his seven string guitar and was the first to bring seven string into the mainstream eye. The seven helped him to become more innovative in his own self accompaniment acting like two sometimes even three instrumentalist playing at the same time. Sure that had been done before but not to the level he took it.

2. Tie Jimi Hendrix / Jimmy Page. They both innovated so many areas in guitar music at around the same time. Hendrix brought the swagger and single note bends and singing leads of blues to mainstream rock. He was one of the first to make musical use of controlled feedback. Page was the first to bring the full force of studio knowledge to the rock guitar such as multi-tracking microphone placement for atmoshpere and so on.

3. Steve Vai - In my estimation he is the first guitarist to truly take the use of the trem bar to its full potential for artistic expression in guitar music. Others before had used it to make squels and false slide bends. He used it in wilder and much subtler ways to create organic riffs that were incredibly vocal and akin to a fretless instrument. He also brought the seven string back into the limelight once again creating an influence that went through nu-metal and now influences the technical metal of modern acts which led to the adoption of the 8 string which influences many current cutting edge technical progressive bands today.

4. The Edge - He (honorable mention to gilmour also) started much of the influence of using delay in the atmospheric ways that we see today. One almost can't step into church or listen to CCM or praise music without hearing some corny delay ridden riff derivative of the Edge in there somewhere. I blame him for much of the delay as a crutch riffs I hear in modern church music today lol. Derivative music aside he is a huge influence on modern riffs his use of delay was innovative.

5. Misha Mansoor - Probably a name none of you may have heard of. He plays for the band periphery. One of the singlehand creators of Djent a genre which took the odd times and rythmic and tonal intesity of the guitarists of meshugga and added melody and progressivism. Mansoor combines the guitar tones of extreme metal with the influences of jazz and atonal music. Using tapping sequences that evoke the sound of arpeggiators used in electronica in there rythmic nature. He and the genre he created are taking heavy music in a brand new direction. Honorable mention for number 5 goes to Tosin Abasi.

Honorable mentions

6. SRV - Brought back blues to new musical and technical heights with the most honed yet soulfull blues technique ive ever seen

7. Dimebag Darrel Abbott - Single handedly kept metal alive during the grunge era. Built the bridge between thrash and the extreme metal we see today.

8. Yngwie Malmsteen - Love em or hate em, the man is responsible for the neoclassical stamp we see all over the prog, symphonic, and heavy metal we see coming out of europe today. Not many guitarists before him were aware of arpeggions in lead sense nor how to sweep them before he came along.

9. Van Halen - Tapping anyone?

10. Les Paul - Gibson anyone? Innovator in the studio with mutitracking delay and phasing. Helped pioneer the solid body guitar. The way he used chording in a lead sense and his use of licks.
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Unread 09-30-2013, 04:35 AM   #51
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Steve Lukather
Jimi Hendrix
Randy Rhoads
George Lynch
Ty Tabor
and about a million others...
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Unread 09-30-2013, 12:40 PM   #52
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The most influential guitarists on me personally are:

1 - Santana: I listened to him more than any other during my early days as a serious student of the instrument. His precise tone still amazes me.

2 - Billy Gibbons: Again, in the early days, I found myself able to copy a few of his licks, but never the impact of his tone.

3 - Jeff Beck: I'm still all over Jeff Beck's Guitar Shop album, even though it's nearly a quarter century old.

4 - David Gilmour: I've spent my life chasing the "perfect note". Gilmour play all notes perfectly.

5 - Albert Lee: I played country music for a living for 15 or so years during a time when you couldn't listen to country radio for an hour with out hearing one of his solos. (Sort of like Brent Mason)

I MUST add a sixth, Jimi Hendrix, because although I didn't study him, all of us were influenced by him. He allowed us to go though doors nobody else could have opened but him.

Last edited by otis_hackett; 09-30-2013 at 12:43 PM. Reason: Hats off to Hendrix
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Unread 09-30-2013, 02:44 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtrdave View Post
I do, too.

The first Blue Murder album is one of my favorites from that era.
I love John Sykes playing. I wouldn't call him an innovator but he is one of the best at what he does. Created some of the tastiest solos of the 80's
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Unread 10-01-2013, 12:41 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otis_hackett View Post
The most influential guitarists on me personally are:

3 - Jeff Beck: I'm still all over Jeff Beck's Guitar Shop album, even though it's nearly a quarter century old.
If you haven't heard these Beck albums, I highly recommend them - "Truth", "Wired", and "Blow by Blow.
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Unread 10-01-2013, 04:15 PM   #55
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1. Mark Waldrop
2. Jonny Buckland
3. Dave Mohr
4. Nigel Hendroff
5. The Edge
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Unread 05-16-2014, 03:03 PM   #56
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1. Tommy Johnston
2. Eric Clapton
3. Dana Key
4. Phil Keaggy
5. Joe Bonamassa

This all falls within 40 years of playing.
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Unread 05-27-2014, 08:31 PM   #57
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1. Muddy Waters
man where do you think Rolling Stones got their name from, a Muddy Water's song. Who do you think then Beatles and Eric Clapton were listening too? Fleetwood Mac , started as a blues band. Buddy Guy, got his start with Muddy Waters.

2. Son House,
This is father type figure who taught Muddy Waters and where Robert Johnson came out of. Eric Clapton loves Robert Johnson, Jimmy Page was a big Robert Johnson fan .

3. Chuck Berry, some who call him the real King of Rock and Roll. Some music refer to that style of lead as Chuck Berry style.

4. Merle Travis, although you could maybe mention Doc Watson here. Merle has a whole finger-picking style or method named after him

5. Glenn Kaiser, you call him a father of Christian Rock. His band was rocking out just as hard and good as any secular band. Something, not real heard from Christian bands at the time. Without Glenn Kaiser, no Third Day, no Kutless, no Demon Hunter, no ......

I could keep going mentioning more like Buddy Guy being the influence on a young Jimi Hendrix.
Albert King, influence on a young Stevie Ray.

Special Mention for Blind Willie Johnson, his song Dark was the Night, Cold was the Ground was launch into outer space on the Space Probe that is currently headed into deep space. A hauntly powerful song inspired about our Lord Jesus Christ and His death on the Cross, Amen.

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Unread 05-27-2014, 08:34 PM   #58
and you were wondering??
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I really need to engage the history of guitar playing more often...

These lists are a good place to start though, I suppose!
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Unread 05-27-2014, 08:49 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrash View Post
I really need to engage the history of guitar playing more often...

These lists are a good place to start though, I suppose!
How far do you want to go back? We could go back into Africa where the style that John Lee Hooker really comes from.
Although, John Lee didn't know where his music came from. John Lee was a big influence on the band The Animal as well as a young Van Morrison, among others, Boom Boom Boom!

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Unread 05-27-2014, 09:04 PM   #60
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What if I throw a curve and mention Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Sonny Rollins?

saxophone gaints !?? Yep! A lot of your best guitar players listen to saxophone players, Jimi Vaughan, BB King, etc.

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