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Unread 03-28-2010, 08:22 PM   #1
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Hi

I'm new to the site. I have visited many times and decided to join. I have been looking at the tabs/chords for a few songs.

I have a question that I am sure has been answered many times on her but not sure how to search for it. When a tab has say "Em/D" what is the chord to be played.

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Unread 03-28-2010, 08:30 PM   #2
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Em/D XX0000
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Unread 03-28-2010, 08:35 PM   #3
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Guess I'm a dummy, not sure I understand the answer. You're saying Em/D is a chord??
X
X
0
0
0
0

Thanks

ETA: Play the bottom 4 strings open??
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Unread 03-28-2010, 08:39 PM   #4
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Play the top 4 strings open. It's a chord.
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Unread 03-28-2010, 09:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rapracing View Post
Guess I'm a dummy, not sure I understand the answer. You're saying Em/D is a chord??
X
X
0
0
0
0

Thanks

ETA: Play the bottom 4 strings open??
Yes, Em/D is a chord.
It's called a compound chord or more commonly called a slash chord.
The way to read it is as follows:
characters to the left of the slash are the chord, in this case an E minor
characters to the right of the slash are the bass notes, in this case a D
It's read "E minor over D"

Other popular slash chords:
D/F#
G/B
A/C#
C/G
and there are many, many more.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 06:02 AM   #6
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There are, of course, many ways to play Em/D. Em contains the notes E, G, and B, so any form you find that includes those notes and adds a D note as the lowest note will work.

x-x-0-0-0-0 works, as does x-5-2-0-0-0 or x-x-0-4-5-3 or x-x-0-9-8-7 or x-x-0-12-12-12. All these are forms of Em/D.

Which you choose will depend upon the particular sound you want and what other instruments are playing. In a band situation, I'd probably just play the Em portion on the three highest strings, using either x-x-x-4-5-3 or x-x-x-9-8-7, and leaving out the D root entirely, since the bass player will be playing the D. If I were playing by myself on acoustic, I might use x-5-2-0-0-0 to get a fuller sound.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 06:11 AM   #7
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WOW!!! Something else to learn. Thanks for the help
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Unread 03-29-2010, 07:14 AM   #8
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ETA: Play the bottom 4 strings open??
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer. View Post
Play the top 4 strings open. It's a chord.
This always confuses me. My girlfriend and I differ over which strings are "top" and which are "bottom"
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Unread 03-29-2010, 11:38 AM   #9
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Bottom is the lower pitch bass strings. Bottom end. Low range. Low end. Lower frequency. Lower pitch. Bottom pitch. Bottom range. Bottom of the chord.

Top is the higher treble strings. Top end. Top of the chord. Top end. High frequency. High pitch. High range. Top notes.

That's how it makes sense to me.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 12:13 PM   #10
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Bottom is the lower pitch bass strings. Bottom end. Low range. Low end. Lower frequency. Lower pitch. Bottom pitch. Bottom range. Bottom of the chord.

Top is the higher treble strings. Top end. Top of the chord. Top end. High frequency. High pitch. High range. Top notes.

That's how it makes sense to me.
That's how I see it too. She sees it as the "high" E string being the closest to the floor when holding the guitar, therefore it is the "bottom" string.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 01:44 PM   #11
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I had a similar experience with my last guitar student who insisted that my "higher up" on the neck was "lower down" the neck.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 02:42 PM   #12
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There are, of course, many ways to play Em/D. Em contains the notes E, G, and B, so any form you find that includes those notes and adds a D note as the lowest note will work.

x-x-0-0-0-0 works, as does x-5-2-0-0-0 or x-x-0-4-5-3 or x-x-0-9-8-7 or x-x-0-12-12-12. All these are forms of Em/D.
So it'd basically be an Em7 chord?
Quote:
Which you choose will depend upon the particular sound you want and what other instruments are playing. In a band situation, I'd probably just play the Em portion on the three highest strings, using either x-x-x-4-5-3 or x-x-x-9-8-7, and leaving out the D root entirely, since the bass player will be playing the D. If I were playing by myself on acoustic, I might use x-5-2-0-0-0 to get a fuller sound.
Thats what we always do at church. If we have a keyboardist they usually do the Em with their RH and play an octave D with their left.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 03:07 PM   #13
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> So it'd basically be an Em7 chord?

Yes, an inversion of Em7 with the 7th (D) on the bottom. So you could also play an x-x-x-4-3-3 (gets the 3, 5, and 7 and omits the E) while letting the bassist play the low D.

There are many options to choose, which is much of the fun. Which option is "best" is a matter of taste, and also a matter of the situation and other instrumentation.

It's very helpful to learn several moveable positions for chords, and also to learn the function of each string for those chord forms ("okay, in this form, the B string is the root note, the E string is the 3rd," and so forth).
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Unread 03-29-2010, 03:18 PM   #14
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> So it'd basically be an Em7 chord?

Yes, an inversion of Em7 with the 7th (D) on the bottom. So you could also play an x-x-x-4-3-3 (gets the 3, 5, and 7 and omits the E) while letting the bassist play the low D.
yeah that'd be 3rd inversion. We are just covering this in Music Theory 2... although the teacher sucks and made it so confusing that one of the students interrupted him and explained it to the class . His explanation was understood immediately...

Quote:

It's very helpful to learn several moveable positions for chords, and also to learn the function of each string for those chord forms ("okay, in this form, the B string is the root note, the E string is the 3rd," and so forth).
I understand the concept, but luckily I dont really have to apply it since I'm a bassist.
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Unread 03-29-2010, 05:27 PM   #15
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I understand the concept, but luckily I dont really have to apply it since I'm a bassist.
You should. It's useful in coming up with walking lines and interesting passing inversions. Unless you're just planning on playing the roots all the time.
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