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Unread 01-08-2010, 05:19 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by metropolis4 View Post
FR is totally a love it or hate it deal.

Pro:
- ability to bend pitch down and up to crazy extremes
- you can play along with all your favorite cheesy 80s hair metal solos

cons:
-Don't break a string!! String changes are rediculously time consuming. You'll always need a spare guitar with you at all times
-If you break a string the guitar is unplayable (whereas with a fixed bridge you can at least keep playing on the remaining strings to get you through the song)
-you have to be careful with your technique so you don't knock yourself out of tune
-tuning stability in general is not as good
-more parts to wear out and break
-dive bombing pinch harmonics is only cool if you're playing in a Van Halen tribute band at the local bar.
-big whammy bar vibrato sounds very dated and lame

When i was a teenager every guitar I owned had a FR. Today I no longer own a guitar with a FR and probably won't ever buy another one.



haha, nope. But luckily the people I know are
uhh from everyhting i've been reading, its kinda a tune once after you get the strings, and itll lock into places for apparently "weeks".

and the floyd on the hellraiser is an original so atleast its a quality one

edit: and i didn't say thanks haha. i sound annoying i know, but thanks for the help so far guys

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Unread 01-08-2010, 07:00 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Chups01098 View Post
uhh from everyhting i've been reading, its kinda a tune once after you get the strings, and itll lock into places for apparently "weeks".
Yeah, that's what the guitar manufacturers want you to believe. In my personal experience however it's just not true. The strings go through a stretching phase so you have to keep unlocking the nut to retune for a couple days. With heavy bending they tend to go out a little and when you use the trem you often knock it out of tune. Also, you get to this point where you've been slowly turning the screw in as the strings stretch and eventually the screw is in as far as it'll go and then you have to unlock the nut and tune with the peg and reset the screw.

I remember one of my guitars with an original floyd every time I'd dive down with the bar it would come back up about 20 cents flat and I'd have to nudge it with my palm to bump it back in place.

There's simply no way any type of tremolo system is going to give you the tuning stability of a fixed bridge. It's basic physics


It's funny, I think you know you want the Schecter, but you feel like you should get the Les Paul and you're looking for justification
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Unread 01-08-2010, 07:08 PM   #48
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Yeah, that's what the guitar manufacturers want you to believe. In my personal experience however it's just not true. The strings go through a stretching phase so you have to keep unlocking the nut to retune for a couple days. With heavy bending they tend to go out a little and when you use the trem you often knock it out of tune. Also, you get to this point where you've been slowly turning the screw in as the strings stretch and eventually the screw is in as far as it'll go and then you have to unlock the nut and tune with the peg and reset the screw.

I remember one of my guitars with an original floyd every time I'd dive down with the bar it would come back up about 20 cents flat and I'd have to nudge it with my palm to bump it back in place.

There's simply no way any type of tremolo system is going to give you the tuning stability of a fixed bridge. It's basic physics


It's funny, I think you know you want the Schecter, but you feel like you should get the Les Paul and you're looking for justification
Pretty darn much haha.

but i do want more info on the fr.

it seems theres two sides to it.

theres people who hate it, say it wont stay in tune, blabla bla

then theres people who love it, say it has perfect tuning stability and rocks...

i just dont know what to think about it
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Unread 01-08-2010, 07:33 PM   #49
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How much do you honestly think you'll use the floyd? If you use it every song, it will be cheesy. If you use it once a day, you'll still have to mess with it. I had a guitar with a trem once. After about a month or two of screwing with it, I locked it down fixed-bridged style, and it stayed that way until I sold it. Unless you play for Slayer, you're not going to use it enough to make the hassle worth it. By the way, my fixed bridge guitar stays in tune for days at a time, without a locking nut. Get a high-quality guitar, and you will have great tuning stability anyway.
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Unread 01-08-2010, 07:43 PM   #50
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How much do you honestly think you'll use the floyd? If you use it every song, it will be cheesy. If you use it once a day, you'll still have to mess with it. I had a guitar with a trem once. After about a month or two of screwing with it, I locked it down fixed-bridged style, and it stayed that way until I sold it. Unless you play for Slayer, you're not going to use it enough to make the hassle worth it. By the way, my fixed bridge guitar stays in tune for days at a time, without a locking nut. Get a high-quality guitar, and you will have great tuning stability anyway.
i dont plan on going whacky with it. i might even block it so you can only go down not up.

i just do see myself using it alot. not in a cheesy way though.

maybe im just scred of hardtail guitars, because the only one i have is my strat and its tunign stability sucks. i've had pros look at it and try stuff and it still sucks. will a lp studio really stay in tune good? with lots of bends and stuff
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Unread 01-08-2010, 07:52 PM   #51
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I can't speak to the tuning stability of a Gibson.

My very low-end ESP once rode around in a black case, in the back of a pickup truck through the deserts of AZ and southern California for the better part of 8 hours. It then went into the trunk of another car, which sat in the 110+ heat for another day. It then was put into an air conditioned room. I pulled it out a couple hours later, and tried to tune it. It was fine.
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:02 PM   #52
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I can't speak to the tuning stability of a Gibson.

My very low-end ESP once rode around in a black case, in the back of a pickup truck through the deserts of AZ and southern California for the better part of 8 hours. It then went into the trunk of another car, which sat in the 110+ heat for another day. It then was put into an air conditioned room. I pulled it out a couple hours later, and tried to tune it. It was fine.
no i mean my strats so bad i tune it, play 3 minutes and its way out. i mean at my local place me and the workers, and the setup guy (who used to be the head guy at Jackson) all tried different things on it. this is the main reason im selling it and getting a nicer guitar
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:04 PM   #53
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no i mean my strats so bad i tune it, play 3 minutes and its way out. i mean at my local place me and the workers, and the setup guy (who used to be the head guy at Jackson) all tried different things on it. this is the main reason im selling it and getting a nicer guitar
I know, I understood what you said. I was commenting on your questioning of the tuning stability of the LP studio, which is a fixed bridge guitar. My guitar is a similar hardware setup, thus the example.
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:05 PM   #54
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I know, I understood what you said. I was commenting on your questioning of the tuning stability of the LP studio, which is a fixed bridge guitar. My guitar is a similar hardware setup, thus the example.
is a strat not fixed bridge? i dont have a tremelo bar or anyything
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:16 PM   #55
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Most strat-type guitars I've seen are set up for some sort of trem.

Does your bridge look like this?




Because that style = really freaking good tuning stability.
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:23 PM   #56
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A big factor in how well any guitar stays in tune, regardless of bridge style, is how the strings are wound and stretched when installed.
Other factors are the quality of the tuning machines and also the nut and bridge saddle slots.
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:30 PM   #57
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A big factor in how well any guitar stays in tune, regardless of bridge style, is how the strings are wound and stretched when installed.
Other factors are the quality of the tuning machines and also the nut and bridge saddle slots.
Yes. These things are just as important, if not more so, than the bridge....
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:32 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by The Phantom Mullet View Post
Most strat-type guitars I've seen are set up for some sort of trem.

Does your bridge look like this?




Because that style = really freaking good tuning stability.
no mine doesnt look like that lol.

and to the guy about winding strings ive tried many styles of winding.

people make string putting on look so easy. . everytime i do it it takes like an hour. i dread restringing.

but i've tried wingind it like theese people at another forum said which is like put it through, and wrap it under and over itself in a way where it locks onto itself. hard to expalin.

then the repair guy at my local place says just put it through all the way, and about two tuners lenght away cut the string. then just push down to hold the string down and tighten the tuner.

again, sorry for my HORRIBLE explanantions
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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:40 PM   #59
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That's the kind of bridge you'll get on an LP, or ESP.

The repair guy at your local place is right. That's a good way to do it. I feed the string through the tuner, and tighten. I give myself enough slack so that the pole will have 3-4 windings on it. Then clip the excess. Then tune the guitar. Then grab onto each one of the strings, and pull on it. Hard. Then re-tune. Repeat. Stretching the strings before they stretch themselves is a good way to help keep in tune....

That, and buy a turbo tuner, which I plan on doing in the near future.

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Unread 01-08-2010, 08:43 PM   #60
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That's the kind of bridge you'll get on an LP, or ESP.

The repair guy at your local place is right. That's a good way to do it. I feed the string through the tuner, and tighten. I give myself enough slack so that the pole will have 3-4 windings on it. Then clip the excess. Then tune the guitar. Then grab onto each one of the strings, and pull on it. Hard. Then re-tune. Repeat. Stretching the strings before they stretch themselves is a good way to help keep in tune....

That, and buy a turbo tuner, which I plan on doing in the near future.

ok so do gibson esp style guitars really have that much better tuning stability over a strat?

and now im kinda leaning towards the studio just for that classy thick lp sound. maybe a fr isnt worth it. if it will stay in tune i wouldnt need a fr
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