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Unread 04-29-2010, 10:37 AM   #61
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Ha! I love this thread.

Welcome, supersoldier. It's great to see part of your story. Just curious - how tall are you?

jthomas, of course I'm no expert, but I think there are lots of ways to lift for gain. One method I've tried to use is Linear 5x5, a system you can see one iteration of here. The idea is that you simplify your workout and do some precise mathematics to figure out how much to lift for each set. The most important key is that you START LIGHT for the 1st set. The cool thing about a 5x5 is that a beginner can add strength quite fast this way. One of the problems with it is that it doesn't work if you don't follow it exactly.

Another thing (suggested to me by a friend who's a world-champion powerlifter) is to focus on the big lifts (deadlift, squat, and bench), and do a resistance day and a reps day for each, with 2-3 days' rest between. So, for example, today I did a heavy day on bench - I started with 85, and my last set was 210. Monday, I did a rep day - 4 sets of 10 at 185. He also says "No powerlifter who knows what he's doing will bench more than twice a week."

The great thing about this is that you only train to failure on one set all week, but you're doing it. And the reasoning behind it comes from something else my buddy said once: "If you want to lift heavy weight, you have to lift heavy weight."

That said, I have read that one way to amp up your results is to increase the intensity of the workout, and there are 3 ways you can do that: increase resistance, increase repetitions, and decrease time between sets. If the workout isn't intense, it's not doing nearly as much as it could be.

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Last edited by Ted Logan; 04-30-2010 at 02:34 PM.
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Unread 04-29-2010, 01:09 PM   #62
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I'm six feet tall most of the time. Depends on whether I get measured before or after a run.

I don't think it's been mentioned yet, but the most important principle of physical training is: DON"T INJURE YOURSELF.

Especially as I get older, owweees take a lot longer to heal. When I was eighteen I could've cut my own head off and it'd grow back overnight. These days I could cut myself shaving and bleed out.

If you're in the gym regularly (or whatever you do), you'll hurt yourself allthe time. And you'll soon realize the difference between that and injuring yourself.

Avoid the owwees!
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Unread 04-29-2010, 07:19 PM   #63
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That is so true. 'No pain, no gain' is terrible advice. Oh, and if I were six feet tall, I'd be happy at 215, too
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Unread 04-30-2010, 02:06 PM   #64
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I can agree about the hacky sack thing. My friends all play and whenever I play with them, it amazes me how quickly I build a sweat.
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Unread 05-02-2010, 05:28 PM   #65
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I have a nutrition question. I stumbled on the concept of intermittent fasting. Looking at that led me to some articles about the digestive cycle. Most articles (those of you that went to high school and paid attention in health and biology class already know this) break it down into three phases like this.... Elimination and maintenance cycle: From 4 am to noon, the cells of the body are dumping waste products, and manufacturing and/or repairing cells. Digestive cycle: From Noon to 8 pm, the body's metabolism is geared to digestion. Assimilation cycle: From 8 pm to 4 am, the body is sending nutrients to cells. (From healthyfutures.net)

My question is this. How many hours a day should you eat? It has occurred to me reading this stuff that maybe during the assimilation and elimination phases you might not want to be cramming a bunch more food into your system.

Has anyone here found that they feel better, preform better athletically, have an easier time staying in shape etc. if they follow a clock so to speak with their diet? Like I never eat before 8:45am and I never eat after 7pm.
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Unread 05-03-2010, 12:02 PM   #66
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I feel IMMENSELY better if I eat a significant, healthy meal every 2-3 hours. Like, 200-400 calories. So here's a typical day for me:

1. Cereal with milk for breakfast (200 calories) at 6:30 AM
2. Mid-morning meal - protein powder and a trail mix bar (400 calories) at 10:00 AM
3. Lunch - Campbells chunky soup and a hunk of bread (400 calories) at 12:00 PM
4. Afternoon snack - almonds and an apple (300 ish calories) at 3:00 PM
5. Dinner - veggies and meat (600 ish calories) at 6:30 PM
6. Evening snack - protein powder and "dessert" (300-400 calories) at 9:30 PM

That totals around 2200 calories a day and matches my calorie intake goals, and it goes with what I've read about gaining muscle mass and keeping metabolism up.
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Unread 05-03-2010, 12:38 PM   #67
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I'm working nights currently, but when I'm home, I find that if I eat a little something before Physical Training (0630-0800) like a Powerbar or a roll or something with some carbs in it, along with my gotta-have-it cup of coffee, I can train harder, longer, and as an additional benefit, I feel like I've got more energy throughout the day.

I can certainly see how tailoring your intake to what your body is trying to do could be a benefit. For me, I tend to think in terms of the activities I'm about to engage in.
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Unread 05-03-2010, 12:41 PM   #68
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Oh, and I just got back from the gym, and it's official: I'm old, weak and completely out of shape. I COULD NOT bench my bodyweight (225), and I could only do 215 ONCE, so I had to rep at 205. D'oh.

I keep telling myself that if I keep at it, it'll get better....it helps. A little.
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Unread 05-03-2010, 03:24 PM   #69
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205 is great, though. Now you have a benchmark to work from. I bet you'll pass 225 in no time, at which point you'll weigh 205!
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Unread 05-10-2010, 02:07 PM   #70
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I thought I'd share some information I've been gleaning. Since I'm into my 40's I've been doing some reading lately about how to maintain better levels of hGH and testosterone as both of these are important to improve your fitness but levels tend to decline as you get older. Here's what I've learned today from reading quite a few articles. Intense work outs that include high reps sets tend to be good for increasing hGH levels, while work outs that focus more on lower reps/heavier lifts tend to increase testosterone. I won't link a bunch of articles, but if you're interested just google the two terms, there's a ton of information on both. For increasing levels of both hormones sleep is extremely important and (no surprise) don't eat much soon before bed and definitely no junk.
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Unread 05-29-2010, 04:17 AM   #71
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I'm on a long recovery of losing weight.I have been diagnosed with congestive heart failure.I also have arterial fibulation,or a rapid heartbeat.Since they added a difibulator I feel a lot better.I dusted off some tennis raquets I bought and play doing a light game or two during the week.I eat a bunch o salad,tons of it now.I lost 8 lbs and a few inches of my waist.I want to lose the weight on my own and not have gastic bybass surgery.I know people who had and they brag how much weight they lost as if they done it on their own.Too many risk factors for me.
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Unread 05-29-2010, 11:41 AM   #72
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I am trying something new: The Organ Removal Diet.
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Unread 05-29-2010, 08:32 PM   #73
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Over the last 2 weeks I've actually started trying... I've been trying to eat a high protein/fiber/vitamin~low fat/carbs/processed foods diet and I've been exercising. So to put it simply I've been eating smaller healthier meals more often and I've stopped eating snack foods and drinking pop. I've kinda been working out, but I need to be more regular with it.

I haven't really lost weight or anything, but my stomach is most definitely starting to tighten up and my pants all feel a little baggier than normal soooo
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Unread 06-15-2010, 10:43 PM   #74
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Finally getting back into the swing of things here.....

My Wii Fit says I'm at 202, but my digital scale reads 206. I would love to claim the Wii Fit, but I tend to trust my old scale.It helps me work harder.

Scaling back portions, eating the proper things, and exercising! I'm looking to drop 20 pounds in the next three months. We shall see if I can be that strict with myself.
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Unread 06-16-2010, 12:23 AM   #75
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How do you guys track the calories you eat? It's easy to do for the labelled stuff, but I have no idea how many calories two bowls of my mom's vegetable soup was tonight. That's what makes tracking calories difficult for me, even though I'm well aware of the use more calories than you eat concept.

I'm 5'8" on a good day, probably closer to 5'7". I'm at 170 pounds right now. Last summer I was over 180, but then I worked at a camp for nine weeks. Over the school year I didn't gain much back. I'd like to be at 160 at the end of the summer. I think that if I do that, I would lose a significant amount of fat on the chest/stomach area. I don't really want to gain much muscle, so my main activities have been running and push ups, although I'm really just beginning right now. I'm young enough that I think my feet can withstand the running, although with my joints I wouldn't be surprised if they were an issue down the road.

Have you found that as you lose the fat off your body, it goes evenly? Or do places around the body with an excessive amount (i.e., stomach vs. arms) initially lose more fat?

I'm running two miles right now, but I'm looking to push myself pretty aggressively over the next couple of weeks to increase that. I want to be able to do five mile before I go back to school, so if I increase my distance by a mile every three weeks, I can do that. And I almost think I could do it in half that time, we'll see about that! I assume that as I run longer distances, I will notice more changes beginning to happen. Once I have established the running distance, I'll begin putting more focus on a weight lifting routine while maintaining the cardio levels.

For me, a really hard habit to kick has been eating before bedtime. I am always hungry, even if I had dinner at 8pm. It must be terrible for me, especially since I don't particularly eat good things at that time of night. Should I just get used to going to bed hungry? I imagine it is partially a habit that my body has gotten used to...I'll work on that one!
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