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Unread 01-14-2006, 01:49 AM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer.
In my praise band, me and the other guitarist have almost entirely given up on chord sheets. We can both do all the changes for all the simple P&W songs (meaning, all the P&W songs... ) by ear, so transposition is not a problem. We just ask what key to play what song in, and we do it.

So is using the capo a crutch to transposition?
i no longer have the option to use chord sheets (worship leader doesn't use them)...and alot of the songs aren't ones i know...it's alot of older Maranatha stuff and hymns...songs i know by recognition, but not songs that i've played before.

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Unread 01-14-2006, 06:03 AM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mt_spiffy
I'm hijacking this thread.

I used to use a capo frequently, on an acoustic. My acoustic playing became less and less frequent, and along with it did my capo use. Eventually my old acoustic (an Alvarez) was stolen, and one of my capos was in the case. In conclusin, I havent played with a capo in several years.

I'm back playing more acoustic now, and so I just bought a new capo. This one:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/...se_pid/361600/

The same kind I used to use. While I use it primarily for acoustic, there may be a song or two in which might may be useful on electric (at the moment, "Everything" by Tye Tribbett, I tune down to Eb and the song is in E). Here's the thing: using this capo on my strat, it plays horribly sharp on the majority of the strings. What's up with that? Do I need a different capo for electric? I certainly hope not, at $15 a piece these things add up. It's not the guitar, it has perfect action, intonation, and I recently got the frets re-dressed. Advice? Thanks.
It's either the tension on that capo is too much for that guitar/string combo, causing it to go sharp or possibly you need a capo with a different radius, one that matched that of your fretboard.

Yes, there are all kinds of capo styles, shapes, tensions, etc...I have at least 5 around here somewhere and a few of them are for specific guitars (I have one just for nylon string guitar...low tension, very wide).

Like gg7 said, check out a Shubb. Certain Kyser's work only on certain guitars so you've got to be careful when buying them.
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Unread 01-14-2006, 09:32 AM   #78
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I think one of the issues with the Kyser (which is what I use) is that if you clamp it on there real quickly (which is what it looks like it's perfect for doing), it will impart a significant amount of sideways motion to a couple of your strings in addition to holding them down against a certain fret. So, basically, if you're not quite careful enough when you put it on, some notes will be bent sharp - unless you tune them down to compensate once the capo is on. Except that if you tune them down, once you take the capo off, your guitar has a couple of strings that are in tune with each other, but significantly flat to the rest of the guitar.

I've found that with all capos, it's best to put them on rather close to the fret that you want the strings stopped at, and with Kysers it can be important to apply them sloooooowly to avoid "catching" the strings in a bent position.

The reason I use Kysers, then, is not the ease of putting the thing on. It's rather the ease of taking it off once I'm done with it. I can start a song with the capo on, and once I don't need it, I don't have to spend any more than 2 seconds (1-2 measures of music) taking it off.

And I agree with the "capos shouldn't be a crutch" position, but I still find a capo to be very useful. I don't know how many of you do this, but I find myself most often using the capo to cover 3-5 of the strings, leaving the others open. Is that common? I don't know, but it's worked pretty well for me...

Nate
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Unread 01-14-2006, 11:02 PM   #79
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Thats whats cool about electric: the strings are so close even a begginer whose played for a week can bar the chords. But if you're doing an easy song (G,D,C or something) go ahead and capo, it's sounds exactly the same
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Unread 01-15-2006, 12:41 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerchordguy
Thats whats cool about electric: the strings are so close even a begginer whose played for a week can bar the chords. But if you're doing an easy song (G,D,C or something) go ahead and capo, it's sounds exactly the same
No it doesn't. Barring removes the aspect of droning open strings when playing open chords, killing a lot of sustain.
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Unread 01-16-2006, 07:11 PM   #81
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I rarely use a capo on electric, I prefer barr chords for playing rhythm on most of the difficult guitar keys. A capo has it's uses though, occasionally you want that open string sound for the style of music your playing (open string sound is predominant in country style guitar). You may also want to do a fingerstyle like arrangement that includes accompaniment and melody notes together, this is difficult to do with barr cords that tie up one of your fingers for the barr. My stance on the issue is if you want to use a capo for a specific effect it is a tool for your arsenal. If you are just using it to avoid learning barr or other movable chord forms, then you are cheating yourself in your guitar playing education, by not developing this useful tool.
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Unread 01-16-2006, 09:29 PM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gg7
i guessed you had a kyser before i even clicked on the link . some people like those. personally i don't because it causes the problems you're having depending on the guitar. try a shubb capo.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtrdave
It's either the tension on that capo is too much for that guitar/string combo, causing it to go sharp or possibly you need a capo with a different radius, one that matched that of your fretboard.
See, now, I dont like these responses, because they involve me spending more money.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nate95366
I've found that with all capos, it's best to put them on rather close to the fret that you want the strings stopped at, and with Kysers it can be important to apply them sloooooowly to avoid "catching" the strings in a bent position.
Except that I tried this, and it didnt help. But I like Kysers for the same reason Nate does.
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