Go Back   Christian Guitar Forum > Musicians > Guitar
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Arcade Mark Forums Read

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Unread 04-20-2005, 02:13 PM   #1
Registered User
 

Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 443
Solid Top

I was just wondering, what qualifies a guitar as a solid top? I always assumed that meant the top was one piece of wood, but I've been noticing supposedly "solid top" guitars that are obviously two pieces. So is my definition wrong, or is there some false advertising going on?

Mosher-Bryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 04-20-2005, 02:49 PM   #2
This Mortal Frame..
 
Demon_Hunter's Avatar
 

Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 9,376
Send a message via AIM to Demon_Hunter
im fairly certain solid top should be a single peice of wood, atleast thats the way it was explained to me, and that any layering of the wood would be lamination.
__________________
"Behold the Man upon a cross, my sin upon His shoulders. Ashamed I hear my mocking voice, call out among the scoffers" - How Deep the Fathers Love for Us


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate View Post
It's indisputable, though, that it has absolutely nothing to do with either copulation or defecation.
Demon_Hunter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2005, 08:12 PM   #3
Registered User
 
Major Tom's Avatar
 

Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 3,843
Most solid tops on even expensive guitars are two piece, jut 'cause most species of lumber don't come wide enuf to do it in one piece. Usually they are bookmatched; from the same slab. I think you would have a hard time finding an acoustic guitar with a one-piece top.


Solid just means it ain't plywood. Or "laminate" as the marketing guys would call it.
__________________
Shut up 'n play yer guitar
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2005, 10:14 PM   #4
...
 
thesteve's Avatar
 

Joined: Apr 2001
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 30,142
Send a message via AIM to thesteve
Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Tom
Solid just means it ain't plywood. Or "laminate" as the marketing guys would call it.
actually Tom, from what I've seen plywood and laminate are fundamentally different. plywood layers the wood vertically, but laminates layer horizontally. a laminate is what you would get if you took two 2x4s and glued them together to make a 4x4 s(ide by side four wide and four high), whereas a plywood would be taking those 2x4s and gluing them together to make a thicker 2x4. in the little construction i've done i've found that plywoods tend to handle heat stress alot better than laminates because laminates crack at the seams easier.
__________________
We've all got ideas. We are the music makers. We make money to buy things, and write down words.

I'm a podcaster
thesteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2005, 11:25 PM   #5
Registered User
 
Major Tom's Avatar
 

Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 3,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesteve
actually Tom, from what I've seen plywood and laminate are fundamentally different. plywood layers the wood vertically, but laminates layer horizontally. a laminate is what you would get if you took two 2x4s and glued them together to make a 4x4 s(ide by side four wide and four high), whereas a plywood would be taking those 2x4s and gluing them together to make a thicker 2x4. in the little construction i've done i've found that plywoods tend to handle heat stress alot better than laminates because laminates crack at the seams easier.
Well, plywood is layers of wood laminated together, therefore it is a laminate - a pretty vague term. A Les Paul could also be called a laminate, since it has a maple cap laminated onto a mahogany body. A neck made from 3 pieces of maple could be called a laminate. If a mfr. listed the top on an acoustic guitar as being a "laminate" it could certainly be either way - but the non-solid tops I have seen are plywood to me, the grain of each alternating layer being oriented at 90 degrees. Usually they just call it a "spruce top" if its made of spruce plywood, but I have seen them referred to as "laminate" tops. In the woodworking industry, as I remember (been a few years), whenever lumber is joined in width to make a wider piece, I don't think its referred to as laminate, ( I think there is a term for that, can't remember...) since most species aren't available in very wide boards and have to be joined together for wide pieces, like acoustic guitar tops. As I remember, laminate usually refers to something glued together in thin layers. But then I could be wrong...
__________________
Shut up 'n play yer guitar
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2005, 11:27 PM   #6
...
 
thesteve's Avatar
 

Joined: Apr 2001
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 30,142
Send a message via AIM to thesteve
hmm...all i know is how i described it is how they are labeled at the home depot.
__________________
We've all got ideas. We are the music makers. We make money to buy things, and write down words.

I'm a podcaster
thesteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2005, 11:44 PM   #7
Registered User
 

Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 443
Ooohhhhh, now I get it! Thanks.
Mosher-Bryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:18 AM.


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2