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Unread 04-26-2001, 07:33 PM   #1
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Increasing Range...

I have a tenor voice, yet there are some notes that I absolutely cannot hit unless I use my falsetto voice. What is the proper way to increase my range? I know it's not too good on my voice if I strain my voice and my throat doesn't feel too good if I do. I suppose increasing my range will take a LONG time?

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Unread 04-27-2001, 11:21 AM   #2
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Just constantly work at it, i sing higher songs, like the ones written by Nouveaux, to increase my range.
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Unread 04-28-2001, 07:35 AM   #3
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gzusphreek is right. You have to work at it. It helps if you warm up before you sing. Try and hit those high notes while you warm up and then sing higher songs. Also, the more you sing, the stronger your muscles get and the larger your range will become. It's all about practice, like most everything else.
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Unread 05-04-2001, 07:28 AM   #4
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I sing a lot in my car. My normal voice range is about a low baritone. Just one year ago, I could never sing Agnus Dei in C, but I can now. One thing that helps is trying to sing low female vocalists' music like Nichole Nordeman, but not low like Kathy Trocolli. She can almost sing lower than me
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Unread 05-08-2001, 11:17 AM   #5
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Warming up is a must. Just sing scales, or there are several warm up thingies you can do. If you dont warm up not only will your range be limited, but you can even hurt your voice if you push it to much. And practice practice practice is a must too. =)
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Unread 05-08-2001, 01:04 PM   #6
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Kijanu,

Here is something to practice.

First, make sure your falsetto sounds natural and not like a flute note blown through a hollow glass. Sing "Ah" on a high C or D in falsetto at a medium volume and sing it as nasal as you can make it. You should feel the resonation of the note in your head and not in your throat or chest.

Once you have practiced it enough and "feel" the note in your head, try to lay back on the nasal tone. Above all, DON'T STRAIN. Your vocal cords should feel some tension, but confidently relaxed. Be sure to maintane the same tone of the "Ah" (make sure it doesn't sound like "Aw" or "Aaa").

If you have a resonably good tone, the next thing to do is transition from the high falsetto to your normal speaking and singing range. The region between your natural speaking voice and your falsetto is known as the passagio. The passagio is a range usually between D to G (above middle C) in tenor voices. You know you're in the passagio when your voice "cracks" or "breaks" like when you go through puberty. The key to singing higher is to transition through this "breaking" point smoothly, evenly and effortlessly. If you've ever heard Bob Carlisle or any other great tenor sing those really high notes, you should notice that he is singing in his falsetto. It doesn't sound like it because the tone of his falsetto sounds like his natural voice.

1. Anyways, enough of the theory and back to the real world. Sing the same "Ah" on the high C or D and then "slide" down to low E below middle C. You should sound like a siren going down. Sing it slowly and smoothly. The key is that you want to transition from your falsetto to natural speaking voice without your voice "cracking." If you are doing it wrong, you voice will jump down a few notes when you hit your passagio range. Keep practicing till you are sliding down each note evenly and smoothly. You should feel the resonation of the notes slide down from your head to your chest. Remember, DON'T STRAIN. You don't want vocal surgery.

2. Next, practice the same thing except start from the low E and go up to the high D. Practice this till you don't have a "crack" or jump in your voice. Start singing lightly at first. This time you should feel the resonation of the notes start in your chest and slide up to your head.

3. Next, start high again and go low and back high again and down, etc. Now you really sound like a siren. Make sure you FEEL the resonation sliding from your head to your chest to your head etc. Keep doing this till it is smooth and people think that there's a fire or something.

4. Finally, practice step 1 exept go down in distinct half steps (ie. C, B, Bb, A, Ab, G, Gb, F, E, Eb ... E). Make sure you can do it without wavering. Vocally, it will kind of feel like you are walking from a 2x4 to a tightrope, then to another 2X4 and then a large path. The key is to know where the "tightrope" range is and to keep your balance while you are on it. It is very hard to do but will be easier with practice.

5. Repeat step 4 except start at the low E and walk up. Remember to be very relaxed, gentle and ballanced when crossing the "tightrope."

With practice of these steps, you should be able to increase your range another 4 - 7 notes and be a phenominal singer.

One last thing, your singing voice is no different than your speaking voice. You just hold the vowell sounds for a longer amount of time. Singing should be natural, not strained.

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Unread 05-08-2001, 01:22 PM   #7
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By the way, one of the best things that you can do is get a library card. There are some excellent books on singing and increasing your range. One good book is "Singing: an Extension of Speech." The chapter called "The Passagio and the Falcetto" has some more great tips for increasing your range.
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