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-   -   Nay ear players who got good at sight reading? (http://www.christianguitar.org/forums/t173249/)

thebas2560 12-17-2008 05:53 AM

Nay ear players who got good at sight reading?
 
Just wodering if any piano players on here are good ear players who worked at, and got good at sight reading. How did you do it? Did you use your ear to help this? Any particular techniques? (I guess I'm being lazy and looking for short cuts... :) )

Rockman33 09-15-2009 03:51 PM

I've been playing keys for about 4 years now and a trick I use for keys (and the sax which i picked up for school band) is to tap whatever beat the song uses that's giving you trouble (often a 16th triplet or dotted eighth) with my feet very slowly and whistle the melody. It's easier to whistle than to play a piano melody, so it helps you learn the rhythm of the song, and then it's a simple matter of reading the notes (hopefully you know how to do that since you're on this forum.)

God bless, hope that helps.

Rockman33 09-15-2009 03:51 PM

oh, and that was my first post on this forum(YAY)

albesureful 04-12-2012 05:47 PM

it is hard to go from play be ear to play by sheet music... The preferred method is the read first then play by ear.

Most musician prefer to play by ear. But to now start to play by sheet music will take dedication and patience. Don't rush it. Take your time.

musicfunman 04-17-2012 03:28 PM

Can an ear player get good at signt reading?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by albesureful (Post 3723454)
it is hard to go from play be ear to play by sheet music... The preferred method is the read first then play by ear.

Most musician prefer to play by ear. But to now start to play by sheet music will take dedication and patience. Don't rush it. Take your time.

I agree with albesureful, and would like to elaborate upon what he wrote.

Yes, it is hard to go from being an ear player to learning to read sheet music. The reason is that, as an ear player, if it's a tune you already know, you can easily hear the music in your head, and be anxious to play it now, rather than having to look at the notes which pretty much tell you the same thing that's already in your head.

If it's a tune you don't know, you instinctively know that if you could just hear it a few times, you could easily play it -- so why bother with the much more involved process of learning it by note?

I first learned to play by ear when I was five years old, when I would sit at the piano with my mother, who would play something for me by ear, and then ask me to play the same thing, which I discovered I easily could.

As my elementary school years progressed, I had few formal music lessons, but continued to improve on my ability to play by ear. Soon, I was chording with my left hand and playing melodies with my right hand for just about any song -- even some film scores and TV themes-- that I had heard.

I finally learned to read treble clef in the seventh grade, when I took a Beginning Instruments class and learned clarinet. Since my goal was to be a college prep music education major, by the 12th grade, I had learned virtually every band and orchestra instrument -- and in the process, taught myself (actually, forced myself) to learn bass clef, and then to put the two clefs together as I struggled at first to read two-handed piano music.

Now, as I compare my sight-reading ability to that of my several local colleagues who are also keyboardists, I find that I sight-read slower than they do -- but I'm able to play virtually anything by ear, something none of them can do, as they all learned to play by reading music, without any experience at playing by ear.

It seems as though the only thing they can play on the keyboard is what they read in the notes in front of them.

Sorry I wrote so much -- I didn't intend to. I hope my experiences give you some additional perspective on your original question.
:thumbsup:

jaffakayke 05-29-2012 03:50 PM

Well I've been playing since i was 7 i think and at the start hardly practised and could just about work out treble clef with big pauses forget bass clef! However, my ear has always been pretty great and since i got this awesome teacher at highschool for music i can now read okayish and practice is daily now;) i think the best way to improve sightreading would definitely be to invest in a book of sheet music which you are familiar with(i got wicked and other musical books coz i love them and also if you do, amazon is always cheapest;)) which means you'll already know the rhythm and just need to focus on the notes. You'll also know if you're wrong coz it'll sound wrong in your head and because you like the piece you'll want to practise more. Since my wicked book my reading is a million times better and i passed my sight reading in my grade 4 exam for the first time;) hope this helps;)

LC7rock 06-07-2013 08:08 AM

A lot of study... know your theory and memorize the rules to how the staff works and eventually you can read it with lots and lots of practice.


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